Soccermatics: Mathematical Adventures in the Beautiful Game

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Bloomsbury Publishing, May 5, 2016 - Mathematics - 288 pages

'Football looked at in a very different way' Pat Nevin, former Chelsea and Everton star and football media analyst

Football – the most mathematical of sports. From shot statistics and league tables to the geometry of passing and managerial strategy, the modern game is filled with numbers, patterns and shapes. How do we make sense of them? The answer lies in the mathematical models applied in biology, physics and economics.

Soccermatics brings football and mathematics together in a mind-bending synthesis, using numbers to help reveal the inner workings of the beautiful game.

This new and expanded edition analyses the current big-name players and teams using mathematics, and meets the professionals working inside football who use numbers and statistics to boost performance.

Welcome to the world of mathematical modelling, expressed brilliantly by David Sumpter through the prism of football. No matter who you follow – from your local non-league side to the big boys of the Premiership, La Liga, the Bundesliga, Serie A or the MLS – you'll be amazed at what mathematics has to teach us about the world's favourite sport.
 

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http://www.themaineedge.com/style/soc... One of the things that first drew me into sports fandom was the prevalence of numbers. Professional sports count a lot of things; as a kid with a proclivity ... Read full review

Contents

The Kickoff
Chapter 2 Chapter 3 Chapter 4 Chapter
Three Points for the Birdbrained Manager
Chapter 7 Chapter 8 Chapter
Youll Never Walk Alone
Chapter 11 Chapter 12 Chapter
Chapter
Copyright

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About the author (2016)

David Sumpter is Professor of Applied Mathematics at the University of Uppsala, Sweden. Born in London but raised in Scotland, he completed his doctorate in Mathematics at Manchester, and was a Royal Society Research Fellow in Oxford before heading to Sweden.

David's research has shown how mathemtiacs can be applied ot anything and everything, and in particular to social behaviour. An incomplete list of his research projects includes: pigeons flying in pairs over Oxford; clapping undergraduate students in the north of England; swarms of locusts traveling across the Sahara; disease spread in remote Ugandan villages; the gaze of London commuters; and the tubular structures built by Japanese amoebae.

In his spare time, he exploits his mathematical expertise in training a successful under-tens football team, Uppsala IF P05. David is a Liverpool supporter with a lifelong affection for Dunfermline Athletic.

collective-behavior.com / @soccermatics

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