The Politics of Power: Freeport in Suharto's Indonesia

Front Cover
University of Hawaii Press, 2003 - Business & Economics - 347 pages
0 Reviews
Even as Major General Suharto consolidated his power in the bloodletting of the mid-sixties, Freeport-McMoRan, the American transnational mining company, signed a contract with the new military regime, the first foreign company to do so. Today, in the isolated jungles of West Papua, a region that is increasingly restive under Indonesian rule, Freeport lays claim to the world's largest gold mine and one of its richest and most profitable copper mines. This volume is the first major analysis of the company's presence in Indonesia. It takes a close and detailed look at the changing nature of power relations between Freeport and Suharto, the Indonesian military, the traditional landowners (the Amungme and Kamoro), and environmental and human rights groups. It examines how and why an American company, despite such rigorous home-state laws, was able to operate in West Papua with impunity for nearly thirty years and adapt to, indeed thrive in, a business culture anchored in corruption, collusion, and nepotism.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Chapter
1
Chapter2
16
Chapter 3
38
Freeport and Jakarta
58
Chapter5
85
Chapter6
115
Chapter7
155
Chapter8
187
Chapter9
220
Chapter10
248
Notes
261
Bibliography
315
Index
337
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page xi - ABRI Angkatan Bersenjata Republik Indonesia [Armed Forces of the Republic of Indonesia...

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (2003)

Denise Leith has a Ph.D. in politics from Macquarie University, Sydney.

Bibliographic information