The Yellow Emperor's Classic of Medicine: A New Translation of the Neijing Suwen with Commentary

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Shambhala Publications, May 10, 1995 - Medical - 336 pages
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The Neijing is one of the most important classics of Taoism, as well as the highest authority on traditional Chinese medicine. Its authorship is attributed to the great Huang Di, the Yellow Emperor, who reigned during the third millennium BCE. This new translation consists of the eighty-one chapters of the section of the Neijing known as the Suwen, or "Questions of Organic and Fundamental Nature." (The other section, called the Lingshu, is a technical book on acupuncture and is not included here.)

Written in the form of a discourse between Huang Di and his ministers, The Yellow Emperor's Classic of Medicine contains a wealth of knowledge, including etiology, physiology, diagnosis, therapy, and prevention of disease, as well as in-depth investigation of such diverse subjects as ethics, psychology, and cosmology. All of these subjects are discussed in a holistic context that says life is not fragmented, as in the model provided by modern science, but rather that all the pieces make up an interconnected whole. By revealing the natural laws of this holistic universe, the book offers much practical advice on how to promote a long, happy, and healthy life.

The original text of the Neijing presents broad concepts and is often brief with details. The translator's elucidations and interpretations, incorporated into the translation, help not only to clarify the meaning of the text but also to make it a highly readable narrative for students—as well as for everyone curious about the underlying principles of Chinese medicine.
 

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A wonderful translation, interpretation, elucidation! He has brought out the poetry within the brilliant but terse thoughts of the ancient teachers. Some people complain about the text, because he does choose to add modern terms and his own clarity about Daoist terminology. Thus, while it sops being a direct translation, it does become much more available to the modern reader & student.  

Contents

1 The Universal Truth
1
2 The Art of Life Through the Four Seasons
5
3 The Union of Heaven and Human Beings
8
4 The Truth from the Golden Chamber
13
5 The Manifestation of Yin and Yang from the Macrocosm to the Microcosm
17
6 The Interplay of Yin and Yang
27
7 Further Discourse on Yin and Yang
30
8 The Sacred Teachings
34
44 Wei Conditions
163
The Separation of Yin and Yang
166
46 Normal and Abnormal Courses of Illness
170
47 Unusual Illness
173
48 Extraordinary Illness
176
49 Channel Pathology in Accordance with the Energy Almanac
180
50 Rudiments of Acupuncture
184
51 Needling Depth in Acupuncture
186

9 The Energetic Cycles of the Universe and Their Effects on Human Beings
36
10 Dysfunction of the Five Zang Viscera
42
11 Further Discourse on the Five Zang Viscera
46
12 Methods of Treatment
48
13 Treatment of the Mind and the Body
50
14 The Art of Medicine
53
15 Doctrines of the Jade Tablet
56
16 Diagnostic Importance and Discussion of the Collapse of the Meridians
58
17 The Methods of Pulse Examination
62
18 Pulse Analysis
71
19 Seasonal Variations and Abnormalities in Pulses
76
20 Determining Life and Death
83
21 Meridian Pathology and Corresponding Pulse Signs
87
22 Seasonal Organ Pathology
90
23 The Paradigm of the Five Elemental Phases
95
24 Channel Constituents and Acupuncture Techniques
98
25 The Preservation of Health
100
26 Acupuncture in Accordance with Cosmic Cycles
103
27 Pathogens
106
28 The Nature of Excess and Deficiency
110
29 A Discourse on the Taiyin and Yangming Channels
115
30 Disorders of the Yangming Channel
118
31 Discussion of Febrile Disease
120
32 Acupuncture in the Treatment of Febrile Disease
124
33 A Discourse on Wen Bing
128
34 Imbalances
131
35 Malarialike Illnesses
134
36 Acupuncture in the Treatment of Malaria
140
37 Pathologic Disorders of Heat and Cold
143
38 Etiology Diagnosis and Treatment of Cough
145
39 Differentiation of Pain
147
40 Conditions of the Abdomen
151
41 Acupuncture in the Treatment of Back Pain
154
42 The Pathology of Wind
157
43 The Bi Syndrome
160
52 Contraindications in Acupuncture
187
53 Principles of Tonification and Sedation in Acupuncture
190
54 The Art of Acupuncture
192
55 Acupuncture Techniques
195
56 Dermatomes of the Channels
198
57 Channels and Collaterals
200
58 Acupuncture Points
201
59 Pathways of the Channels
205
60 Acupoints along Skeletal Indentations
208
61 Acupuncture Treatment in Water and Febrile Diseases
211
62 Regulation of the Channels
215
63 Acupuncturing the Superficial Luo
223
64 Acupuncture According to the Seasons
228
65 Biao and Ben and the Transmission of Disease
231
66 Energy Almanac
235
67 The FivePhase Circuits
241
68 The Six Atmospheric Influences
245
69 Effects of the Five Elemental Phases and the Six Atmospheric Influences
248
70 Rules of Phase Energetics
259
71 The Six Macrocosmic Influences
266
72 Acupuncture in Epidemiology
273
73 Etiology of Disease
277
74 Essentials of Disease and Therapy
280
75 The Yellow Emperor on Pathology
287
76 The Importance of Correct Diagnosis
289
77 The Five Failings of Physicians
292
78 The Four Lapses of Physicians
294
79 The Three Yin and Three Yang Channels in the Human Body
295
80 Growth and Decline of Energy
299
81 Subtle Reasoning
301
Bibliography
303
About the Translator
305
Index
307
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About the author (1995)

Maoshing Ni, PhD, is a doctor of Oriental medicine and a licensed acupuncturist in Santa Monica, California. He is also the author of Chinese Herbology Made Easy and The Tao of Nutrition.

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