Gender and Sexuality in Star Trek: Allegories of Desire in the Television Series and Films

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McFarland, Aug 26, 2009 - Performing Arts - 239 pages
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Studying the Star Trek myth from the original 1960s series to the 2009 franchise-reboot film, this book challenges frequent accusations that the Star Trek saga refuses to represent queer sexuality. Arguing that Star Trek speaks to queer audiences through subtle yet provocative allegorical narratives, the analysis pays close attention to representations of gender, race, and sexuality to develop an understanding of the franchise's queer sensibility. Topics include the 1960s original's deconstruction of the male gaze and the traditional assumptions of male visual mastery; constructions of femininity in Star Trek: Voyager, particularly in the relationship between Captain Janeway and Seven of Nine; and the ways in which Star Trek: Enterprise's adoption of neoconservative politics may have led to its commercial and aesthetic failure.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
One Lonely Planets
9
Two Futures End
34
Three Projecting Desire
48
Four Queering Gender
74
Five The Seething Skin
97
Six The Twilight of Identity
118
Seven White Whales
135
Eight An Epic for Women
165
Nine The Echo Over the Voice
187
Afterword
203
Chapter Notes
211
Bibliography
223
Index
229
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

David Greven is associate professor of English at the University of South Carolina. He lives in Columbia, South Carolina.

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