The Art of the Islamic Garden

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Crowood, 2004 - Gardening - 208 pages
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The Islamic garden is regarded as one of the highest forms of visual art in the civilization of Islam. The principal elements are water and shade; they are also characterized by the chahar-bagh: a four-fold pattern, constructed around a central pool or fountain, with four streams flowing toward the four corners of the earth. Aesthetically, this design provides a striking feature in itself; however, a true appreciation of an Islamic garden is only ever complete with an understanding of the spiritual symbolism manifested in its design and planting. This lavish book provides both an intellectual guide to the symbolism of the Islamic garden and a practical guide to its component parts, with recommendations for suitable trees, shrubs, and flowers and advice on creating an Islamic garden in cooler climates. Garden designer Emma Clark teaches Visual Islamic and Traditional Arts at The Prince’s Foundation, London.

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interesting.. nice

Contents

Contents
7
Water
87
Trees and Shrubs 1 13
116
Copyright

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About the author (2004)

Emma Chichester Clark was born in London, England, but grew up in Ireland. In 1975 she went back to England to attend the Chelsea School of Art in London. After completing her undergraduate degree, she enrolled at the Royal College of Art for her master's degree. She was approached by an editor at London publisher Bodley Head to illustrate for her first children's book entitled, Listen to This. Clark is considered one of England's most distinguished picture book creators. She has written and illustrated many of her own picture books while also creating accompanying artwork for numerous stories, picture books, anthologies, and retellings by other writers, including Roald Dahl. In her own books, which include Up in Heaven, The Story of Horrible Hilda and Henry, and the award-winning I Love You, Blue Kangaroo!, she features child, adult, and animal characters in humorous situations that provide realistic portrayals of human feelings and failings. Clark was also a visiting lecturer at Middlesex Polytechnic and City and Guilds School of Art, 1984-86. She had an exhibition of her illustrations at the Thumb Gallery, England, 1984 and 1987.

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