Aristocrats of Color: the Black Elite 1880-1920 (p)

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University of Arkansas Press, 1990 - HISTORY - 467 pages
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Every American city had a small, self-aware, and active black elite, who felt it was their duty to set the standard for the less fortunate members of their race and to lead their communities by example. Professor Gatewood's study examines this class of African Americans by looking at the genealogies and occupations of specific families and individuals throughout the United States and their roles in their various communities. --from publisher description.
 

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Aristocrats of color: the Black elite, 1880-1920

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Class has been a powerful force within Afro-American society, at times dividing blacks almost as sharply as race separated them from whites, Gatewood shows. Focusing on "old families'' who saw ... Read full review

Contents

Origins
1
Prologue
3
Background and Antecedents
7
People and Places
31
Prologue
33
Washington Capital of the Colored Aristocracy
38
Aristocrats of Color in the South
69
The Upper Tens in the Northeast
96
The Genteel Performance
185
UpperClass Club Life
214
The Education of the Elite
253
Churches of the Aristocracy
279
Aristocrats of Color and Jim Crow
308
Changes and Continuities
333
Prologue
335
Into the 1920s
342

Elites in the Midwest and West
115
Color Culture and Behavior
141
Prologue
143
The Color Factor
151
Notes
361
Bibliography
425
Index
451
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Page 10 - I cherished the hope that suffering had humbled them and prepared them to perform a glorious part in the reformation of our country, but the more I mingle with them the fainter are my hopes. They have as much caste among themselves as we have and despise the poor as much I fear as their pale brethren."74 Nevertheless, class distinctions persisted.

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