A Social and Religious History of the Jews: Late Middle Ages and the era of European expansion, 1200-1650

Front Cover
Columbia University Press, 1983 - History - 620 pages
1 Review

Why do smokers claim that the first cigarette of the day is the best? What is the biological basis behind some heavy drinkers' belief that the "hair-of-the-dog" method alleviates the effects of a hangover? Why does marijuana seem to affect ones problem-solving capacity? Intoxicating Minds is, in the author's words, "a grand excavation of drug myth." Neither extolling nor condemning drug use, it is a story of scientific and artistic achievement, war and greed, empires and religions, and lessons for the future.

Ciaran Regan looks at each class of drugs, describing the historical evolution of their use, explaining how they work within the brain's neurophysiology, and outlining the basic pharmacology of those substances. From a consideration of the effect of stimulants, such as caffeine and nicotine, and the reasons and consequences of their sudden popularity in the seventeenth century, the book moves to a discussion of more modern stimulants, such as cocaine and ecstasy. In addition, Regan explains how we process memory, the nature of thought disorders, and therapies for treating depression and schizophrenia. Regan then considers psychedelic drugs and their perceived mystical properties and traces the history of placebos to ancient civilizations. Finally, Intoxicating Minds considers the physical consequences of our co-evolution with drugs--how they have altered our very being--and offers a glimpse of the brave new world of drug therapies.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

p. 596 note 18 (referring to p. 378-9) Jewish disputations with Christians in Abyssinia (Ethiopia), including in the time of Patriarch Afonso Mendez (Alphonso Mendes)
This is Aescoly's summary of
the beliefs of the Falashas regarding the Messiah as summarized from d'abbadie's journals http://www.persee.fr/web/revues/home/prescript/article/cea_0008-0055_1961_num_2_5_2963
This is the disputation in Abyssinia:
https://archive.org/stream/rerumaethiopica00beccgoog#page/n480/mode/2up (p. 403-404 has summaries of chapters XII and XIII)
(Intro: pp. xlvii-xlviii) "Vocabula certe latina sunt, at saepe numero vel obsoleta, vel minus a latinis scriptoribus usitata. Saepe implexus et dum brevitati studet obscurus, et quod magis mireris brevitati aliquando coniuncta prolixitas, ut potissimum videre est in concionibus, in epistolis et in disputationibus, quas cum haereticis habuit et in ea praesertim qua errores cuiusdam Iudaei refutavit (2).
(2) Suspicor disputationem istam ab ipsomet Patriarcha habitam olim in Lustitania fuisse cum alio Iudaeo et scripto consignatam secum inter cetera sua scripta in Aethiopiam attulisse, tum quia nihil in ea invenitur quod ad Iudaeos aethiopicos (Falaxas) referri potest, tum quia semel et iterum nomen Iudaei Salomon, quocum disputabat, in aliud nomen immutatur. Haec disputatio longissima legitur lib. II, capp. XII et XIII, Rerum Aethiopicarum, VIII, pp. 231-255."
These are the other editions of Rerum Aethiopicarum: http://www.bookprep.com/book/mdp.39015070410900
 

Contents

OTTOMAN EMPIRE
3
THE FIRST FIVE CENTURIES
7
II MEHMED THE CONQUEROR BAYEZID II
43
INCIPIENT STAGNATION
122
RELIGIOUS CONTROLS AND DISSENSIONS
161
SOCIOECONOMIC TRANSFORMATIONS
182
PERSIAIRAN
296
LAWS HOMILIES AND THE BIBLE
334
ON ISLAMS PERIPHERY
363
ABBREVIATIONS
439
INDEX TO VOLUMES IVIII
514
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

When God was a Woman
Merlin Stone
Limited preview - 1978
All Book Search results »

About the author (1983)

Edward D. berkowitz is professor of history and public policy and public administration at George Washington University. He is the author of eight books and the editor of three collections. During the seventies he served as a staff member of the President's Commission for a National Agenda, helping President Carter plan for a second term that never came to be.

Bibliographic information