The Arts of China

Front Cover
University of California Press, Jan 1, 1984 - Art, Chinese - 278 pages
Intended both for the general reader and the serious student, "The Arts of China" presents a fascinating and balanced picture of Chinese art from the Stone Age to the present day. The author concerns himself not only with art, but also with Chinese philosophy, religion, and the realm of ideas. At the same time, he places the arts in their political and social setting. Hence his book is not merely a history of art but, to some degree, a cultural history of China as well.
 

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this book is telling me alot about the ancient chinas history it is very interesting

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NO images, Copyright wins as usual.

Contents

Before the Dawn of History i
1
The Shang Dynasty
12
The Chou Dynasty
31
The Period of the Warring States
40
The Chin and Han Dynasties
54
The Three Kingdoms and the Six Dynasties
85
The Sui and Tang Dynasties
114
The Five Dynasties and the Sung Dynasty
141
The Yuan Dynasty
179
The Ming Dynasty
198
The Ching Dynasty
223
The Twentieth Century
248
Notes to the Text
265
Books for Reference and Further Reading
269
Index
273
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About the author (1984)

Michael Sullivan (born 1916) is a British art historian and one of the major Western pioneers in the field of modern Chinese art history and criticism. Sullivan is a graduate of Rugby School and graduated from Cambridge in architecture in 1939. He was in China from 1940–1946 with the International and Chinese Red Cross followed by teaching and doing museum work in Chengdu, where he met and married Wu Huan (Khoan), a biologist who gave up her career to work with him. He received a PhD from Harvard University (1952) and a post-doctoral Bollingen Fellowship. He subsequently taught in the University of Singapore, and returned to London in the 1960s to teach at the School of Oriental and African Studies. Then he became Head of the Department of Oriental Art at Stanford University from 1966 to 1984, before settling in Oxford as a Fellow by Special Election at St Catherine's College, Oxford.

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