Women at Work: The Transformation of Work and Community in Lowell, Massachusetts, 1826-1860

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Columbia University Press, 1981 - Business & Economics - 312 pages
2 Reviews

In this prize-winning study, Thomas Dublin explores, in carefully researched detail, the lives and experiences of the first generation of American women to face the demands of industrial capitalism. Dublin describes and traces the strong community awareness of these women from Lowell and relates it to labor protest movements of the 1830s and '40s.

 

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User Review  - mdobe - LibraryThing

Excerpted as "Factory Employment as Female Empowerment" in Gary Kornblith, ed., The Industrial Revolution in America (1998) In the 1830s and 1840s the mills at Lowell Massachusetts attracted young ... Read full review

Review: Women at Work: The Transformation of Work and Community in Lowell, Massachusetts, 1826-1860

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Contents

Women Workers and Early Industrialization
iii
The Lowell Work Force 1836 and the Social Origins of Women Workers
xxv
The Social Relations of Production in the Early Mills
32
The Boardinghouse
57
The Early Strikes The 1830s
62
The Ten Hour Movement The 1840s
82
The Transformation of Lowell 18361850 and the New Mill Work Force
106
Immigrants in the Mills 18501860
119
Preparation of the Hamilton Company Payroll 1836
183
APPENDIX 2 The Social Origins Study
193
The Hamilton Company Work Force August 1850 and June 1860
198
APPENDIX 4 The 1860 Millhand Sample
204
Sources of Bias and Considerations of Representativeness
213
Abbreviations
225
Notes
227
Selected Bibliography
267

Housing and Families of Women Operatives
139
Careers of Operatives 18361860
157
The Operatives Response 18501860
172
Index
283
Copyright

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Page iv - In the social production which men carry on they enter into definite relations that are indispensable and independent of their will; these relations of production correspond to a definite stage of development of their material powers of production. The sum total of these relations of production constitutes the economic structure of society — the real foundation on which...

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About the author (1981)

Thomas Dublin is professor of history at the State University of New York, Binghamton. cHe has edited two colections, Farm to Factory, Second Edition and Immigrant Voices and authored Transforming Women's Work: New England Lives in the Ninteenth Century.

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