Brainwashing: The Science of Thought Control

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OUP Oxford, Jul 27, 2006 - Medical - 336 pages
30 Reviews
Throughout history, humans have attempted to influence and control the thoughts of others. Since the word 'brainwashing' was coined in the aftermath of the Korean War, it has become part of the popular culture, served as a topic for jokes, and been exploited to create sensational headlines. It has also been the subject of learned discussion from many disciplines: including history, sociology, psychology, and psychotherapy. But until now, a crucial part of the debate has beenmissing: that of any serious reference to the science of the human brain. Descriptions of how opinions can be changed, whether by persuasion, deceit, or force, have been almost entirely psychological.In Brainwashing, Kathleen Taylor brings the worlds of neuroscience and social psychology together for the first time. In elegant and accessible prose, and with abundant use of anecdotes and case-studies, she examines the ethical problems involved in carrying out the required experiments on humans, the limitations of animal models, and the frightening implications of such research. She also explores the history of thought-control and shows how it still exists all around us, frommarketing and television, to politics and education.

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Review: Brainwashing: The Science of Thought Control

User Review  - Goodreads

A good starting point for anyone seeking to understand some of the underlying neurological reasons why people join cults or why people are willing to kill in the name of religion. A lesson to pick from the book: "Perhaps, we should not trust our brains that much." Read full review

Review: Brainwashing: The Science of Thought Control

User Review  - Joshua - Goodreads

A good starting point for anyone seeking to understand some of the underlying neurological reasons why people join cults or why people are willing to kill in the name of religion. A lesson to pick from the book: "Perhaps, we should not trust our brains that much." Read full review

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About the author (2006)

Kathleen Taylor is a research scientist in the Department of Physiology at the University of Oxford. She has been long-listed for the 2005 Aventis Science Book Prize, and short-listed for the MIND Book of the Year Award, and in 2003 she won first prize in both the THES/OUP Science Essay competition and the THES Humanities and Social Sciences Writing Prize.

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