The Battle-field of Bunker Hill: With a Relation of the Action by William Prescott, and Illustrative Documents. A Paper Communicated to the Massachusetts Historical Society, June 10, 1875, with Additions

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Page 16 - ... to come. That blood has called both American continents to republican independence, and has awakened the nations of Europe to a sense, and in future, I hope, to the practice of their rights. Such have been the effects of a resistance to oppression, which was, by many pretended wise men of the times, called rashness; while it was duty, virtue ; — and has been a signal for the emancipation of mankind.
Page 16 - Son, whose early strength was given to her sacred struggles, and whose riper years are now permitted to behold the splendor of her triumphs. In the fulness of our hearts we give thanks to Almighty God, who has guided and guarded your high career of peril and renown. Permit us, beloved General, again to welcome you to our borders; to express our ardent hopes, that your valuable life may be prolonged to the utmost limits of earthly happiness; that the land which has been enriched with the dew of your...
Page 16 - God, who has guided and guarded your high career of peril and renown. "Permit us, beloved General, again to welcome you to our borders; — to express our ardent hopes, that your valuable life may be prolonged to the utmost limits of earthly happiness; — that the land which has been enriched with the dew of your youth, may be honored as the asylum of your old age; — that the country which now blends your fame with the mild lustre of Washington, may henceforth hail you as a citizen of Washington's...
Page 36 - No enemy appearing, orders soon came that our people at the entrenchment were retreating and for us to secure the retreat. I immediately marched for their relief, the regulars did not come off from Bunker's Hill, but have taken possession of the entrenchments, and our people make a stand on Winter Hill, and we immediately went to entrenching; flung up by morning an entrenchment about 100 feet square. Done principally by our regiment under Putnam's directions, had but little sleep the night.
Page 19 - Massachusetts regiments in the redoubt and at the breastwork, excepting one company which was stationed first in Charlestown, and afterwards at a rail fence south of the redoubt. This company retired into the redoubt during the action. No provisions were received, and the works were left to the defence of the brave men who built them, already exhausted by hunger and fatigue. The cannonade was a severe trial to raw soldiers who had never heard the sound of artillery, and unfortunately a private was...
Page 16 - To this address the General replied — "With profound reverence, sir, I tread this holy ground, where the blood of American patriots — the blood of Warren and his companions, early and gloriously spilled, aroused the energy of three millions, and secured the happiness of ten millions, and of many other millions of men in times to come.
Page 26 - was often heard to say that his great anxiety that night was to have a screen raised, however slight, for his men before they were attacked, which he expected would be early in the morning, as he knew it would be difficult, if not quite impossible, to make raw troops, however full of patriotism, to stand in an open field against artillery and well-armed and well-disciplined soldiers. He therefore strenuously urged on the work ; and every subaltern and private labored with spade and pickaxe, without...
Page 9 - This they did ; and had time to form somewhat regularly behind a fence half of stone and two rayles of wood. Here nature had formed something of a breastwork, or else there had been a ditch many years agone.
Page 32 - tis thought by our commander that it will be the most bloody Engagement our American World ever knew — our men are Resolute and determined. On an alarm (of which we have had several within a week) our men seem .' cheerfully to fly to their Alarm posts. We have several thousands of Pikes, with 12 feet handles, which are placed along our Lines — and most certainly will be very useful if they attempt to scale the walls. I cannot think but 500 of them at Bunker's Hill at the time of the Battle would...
Page 36 - This action was rather precipitate, the entrenchment exposed to the fire of all the ships, and in a place where the enemy landed their men under the cover of the cannon from the ships, and the post not^ sufficiently guarded; they forced the entrenchments without much difficulty." 20. " Went out to Roxbury ; had some conversation with Gen. Spencer on last Saturday affair with the respect to the beginning on Bunker's Hill in the place where we did. Came home and found Mr. McCall, Mr. Leavens and Josiah...

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