Raleigh: North Carolina's Capital City on Postcards

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Arcadia Publishing, Sep 1, 1996 - History - 128 pages
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Raleigh: North Carolina's Capital City on Postcards contains more than two hundred postcard images, which together capture much of what life was like in the "City of Oaks" and its neighbors in Wake County during the first half of the twentieth century. The Raleigh area has experienced tremendous growth since World War II, and much of what is fondly remembered by old-timers has been lost to the demands of development and the rigors of time. Some of the well-known landmarks, businesses, and characters, however, were captured on film by enterprising postcard photographers who were unknowingly creating an invaluable archive of historical data which now gives us an insight into the way life was lived in North Carolina's capital during the "Golden Age of Postcards." This wonderful new book brings to life the history of this diverse and dynamic region through carefully selected postcards from that era, accompanied by informative and insightful captions as well as a helpful essay on the history and importance of postcards.
 

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Contents

Introduction
7
Old Downtown Scenes
25
4 Colleges and Schools
61
Around the City
89
Raleighs Neighbors in Wake County
105
Index
127
Copyright

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About the author (1996)

Local historians and postcard collectors Norman D. Anderson and B.T. Fowler invite the reader on a journey into the history of Raleigh and neighboring Wake County communities. Come take a tour of Union Square and the Capitol; view the state office buildings and institutions when streetcars were the easiest way to get around town; stroll down Fayetteville Street before it became a mall; and imagine yourself on a Sunday afternoon trolley excursion to Bloomsbury Park. Raleigh: North Carolina's Capital City on Postcards is an educational and entertaining history experience that will be treasured by young and old, resident and visitor alike, for years to come.

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