The Feast Nearby: How I lost my job, buried a marriage, and found my way by keeping chickens, foraging, preserving, bartering, and eating locally (all on $40 a week)

Front Cover
Potter/TenSpeed/Harmony, May 24, 2011 - Cooking - 272 pages
7 Reviews

Within a single week in 2009, food journalist Robin Mather found herself on the threshold of a divorce and laid off from her job at the Chicago Tribune. Forced into a radical life change, she returned to her native rural Michigan.
 
There she learned to live on a limited budget while remaining true to her culinary principles of eating well and as locally as possible. In The Feast Nearby, Mather chronicles her year-long project: preparing and consuming three home-cooked, totally seasonal, and local meals a day--all on forty dollars a week.
 
With insight and humor, Mather explores the confusion and needful compromises in eating locally. She examines why local often trumps organic, and wonders why the USDA recommends white bread, powdered milk, and instant orange drinks as part of its “low-cost” food budget program.
 
Through local eating, Mather forges connections with the farmers, vendors, and growers who provide her with sustenance. She becomes more closely attuned to the nuances of each season, inhabiting her little corner of the world more fully, and building a life richer than she imagined it could be.
 
The Feast Nearby celebrates small pleasures: home-roasted coffee, a pantry stocked with home-canned green beans and homemade preserves, and the contented clucking of laying hens in the backyard. Mather also draws on her rich culinary knowledge to present nearly one hundred seasonal recipes that are inspiring, enticing, and economical--cooking goals that don’t always overlap--such as Pickled Asparagus with Lemon, Tarragon, and Garlic; Cider-Braised Pork Loin with Apples and Onions; and Cardamom-Coffee Toffee Bars.
 
Mather’s poignant, reflective narrative shares encouraging advice for aspiring locavores everywhere, and combines the virtues of kitchen thrift with the pleasures of cooking--and eating--well.




From the Hardcover edition.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Stembie3 - LibraryThing

I'm about halfway through this book and I'm slightly disappointed because it's not living up to its long subtitle. I'm learning nothing about how the author coped with her job loss or end of her ... Read full review

Review: The Feast Nearby: How I lost my job, buried a marriage, and found my way by keeping chickens, foraging, preserving, bartering, and eating locally (all on $40 a week)

User Review  - Goodreads

This was a pleasant read about the author's new life in a cabin by a lake in Michigan. She loves good, local food and uses her $40 per week food money wisely, buying good food locally produced. She ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
Section 2
i
Section 3
iii
Section 4
9
Section 5
18
Section 6
30
Section 7
37
Section 8
49
Section 15
143
Section 16
158
Section 17
175
Section 18
186
Section 19
194
Section 20
209
Section 21
220
Section 22
231

Section 9
62
Section 10
79
Section 11
95
Section 12
105
Section 13
113
Section 14
127
Section 23
240
Section 24
249
Section 25
251
Section 26
253
Section 27
257

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2011)

Robin Mather is a Michigan native and third-generation journalist whose passion for food and its sources has taken her around the country and the world. She is a two-time James Beard Award finalist for feature writing on food, and her work has been syndicated in newspapers and magazines across North America and abroad.
 
Mather was the food editor of the Detroit News, a senior writer at Cooking Light magazine, and most recently, a staff reporter for the food section of the Chicago Tribune. She also started and ran a small goat dairy from 1995 to 2000 in Mississippi. Her first book, A Garden of Unearthly Delights: Bioengineering and the Future of Food, was the first to expose genetic modification of crops and livestock (and its consequences for the food supply) for a broad market. She lives in a 650-square-foot cottage on a small lake in southwest Michigan, where she is eight miles from the nearest street light. Visit her online at thefeastnearby.com. 


From the Hardcover edition.

Bibliographic information