Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass

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Penguin, Jun 7, 2005 - Fiction - 160 pages
29 Reviews
This dramatic autobiography of the early life of an American slave was first published in 1845, when its young author had just achieved his freedom. Douglass' eloquence gives a clear indication of the powerful principles that led him to become the first great African-American leader in the United States.
 

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Review: Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass (The Autobiographies #1)

User Review  - Jere Gobert-Blades - Goodreads

One of the best books I ever read. His story is an inspiration for a young black person like myself to want to continue my education because of how hard he fought for his education & the reasons his ... Read full review

Review: Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass (The Autobiographies #1)

User Review  - Terri - Goodreads

It is important for these narratives to continue to be read because the effects of slavery and racism are still being felt to this day. It is American history and should be felt and shared by all. Read full review

Contents

CHAPTER I
19
CHAPTER II
25
CHAPTER III
32
CHAPTER IV
37
CHAPTER V
42
CHAPTER VI
47
CHAPTER VII
51
CHAPTER VIII
58
CHAPTER IX
64
CHAPTER X
70
CHAPTER XI
106
APPENDIX
122
AFTERWORD
129
SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY
141
Copyright

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About the author (2005)

Frederick Douglass, born around1817, was the son of an African-American woman and a white slaveholder. Brilliant and brave, Douglass once led a minor insurrection against his masters—but unlike the famous Nat Turner, Douglass escaped his venture alive. While still a young man he fled, hungry and hunted, to the North, where he was befriended by abolitionists. His dramatic autobiography was published in 1845, creating a sensation and spurring Douglass’s career as a militant, uncompromising leader of African-Americans. He recruited African-American volunteers for the Civil War and later secured and protected the rights of the freemen. Douglass later became secretary of the Santo Domingo Commission, Recorder of Deeds in the District of Columbia, and United States Minister to Haiti. He died in 1895.
 
Peter J. Gomes was the minister at Memorial Church at Harvard University from 1974 until his death in 2011. Among his many books are The Good Book: Reading the Bible with Mind and Heart and Strength for the Journey: Biblical Wisdom for Daily Living.
 
Gregory Stephens is Lecturer of Cultural Studies and Film in the Department of Literature in English, University of West Indies—Mona. He is the author of On Racial Frontiers: The New Culture of Frederick Douglass, Ralph Ellison, and Bob Marley. Previously he was an award-winning songwriter and journalist in Austin and Laredo, Texas, as well as a bilingual public school teacher (Spanish/English). He lives in Kingston, Jamaica.

Bibliographic information