The Art of the Exposition: Personal Impressions of the Architecture, Sculpture, Mural Decorations, Color Scheme & Other Aesthetic Aspects of the Panama-Pacific International Exposition

Front Cover
P. Elder and Company, 1915 - Panama-Pacific International Exposition - 91 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 40 - FACING west from California's shores, Inquiring, tireless, seeking what is yet unfound, I, a child, very old, over waves, towards the house of maternity, the land of migrations, look afar, Look off the shores of my Western sea, the circle almost circled ; For starting westward from Hindustan, from the vales of Kashmere, From Asia, from the north, from the God, the sage, and the hero, From the south, from the flowery peninsulas and the spice islands, Long having...
Page 39 - THE MOON SINKS YONDER IN THE WEST WHILE IN THE EAST THE GLORIOUS SUN BEHIND THE HERALD DAWN APPEARS— THUS RISE AND SET IN CONSTANT CHANGE THOSE SHINING ORBS AND REGULATE THE VERY LIFE OF THIS OUR WORLD — Kalidasa (Sanskrit poet).
Page 39 - Egyptian), a falconer, an elephant with a hpwdah containing a figure embodying the spirit of the East, attended by Oriental mystics representing India, a Buddhist Lama bearing his emblem of authority, a camel and rider (Mahometan), a Negro servitor, and a Mongolian warrior. The size of the group, crowning a triumphal arch one hundred and sixty feet in height, may be inferred from the fact that the figure of the Negro servitor is thirteen feet six inches in height.
Page 39 - From left to right the figures are, the French Trapper, the Alaskan, the Latin-American, the German, the Hopes of the Future (a white boy and a Negro, riding on a wagon), Enterprise, the Mother of Tomorrow, the Italian, the Anglo-American, the Squaw, the American Indian.
Page 61 - ... a shadowy figure in the foreground holds a palm for the dead. The fourth panel represents the "Inspirations of All Art," five figures symbolizing Music, Painting, Architecture, Poetry and Sculpture. Flying above these are two winged figures, one holding a torch flaming with the sacred oil that has been brought from the altar, the other drawing back the veil of darknes, revealing the tangible, visible expression of Art to mortal eyes. Gardens. — Between the columns of the colonnade and along...
Page 60 - ... checks for an instant their flight. The central figure, the guardian of the altar, still holds the torch, and below her are three satellites, one clasping a cruse of oil, another pouring oil upon the altar while she holds in her hand a flaming brand, ready to renew the flame should it falter, a third zealously -watching the fire as it burns. Opposite these, a figure holds a crystal gazing-globe, in which the future has been revealed to her, but her head is turned to watch the flight of the earthly...
Page 41 - The great Column of Progress is the first column in the world, so far as I know, whose design was inspired by a purely imaginative motive, and the first sculpture column at any exposition. It must be considered the most splendid expression of sculpture and architectural art in the Exposition. Mr. Calder may justly feel proud of this great idea, and Mr. MacNeil has added new laurels to his many accomplishments in the free modeling of the very daring group at the top.
Page 66 - The one to the left, as seen from the Court of the Universe, tells of the dreams which led to the exploring and exploiting of the great West. Carefully designed figures of great refinement represent "Hope" and "Illusory Hope," scattering tempting bubbles, heading the procession of stately women.
Page 37 - It is rather a flight from those Manship figures to the colossal groups of the Nations of the East and of the West, but one is irresistibly drawn to these wonderfully effective compositions. Their location makes them the most prominent groups in the Exposition ensemble. The harmonious cooperation of Calder, Roth, and Lentelli has resulted in the creation of a modern substitute for the old Roman quadriga, which so generally crowns triumphal arches. Both groups are so skillfully composed as to have...
Page xiv - ... fundamental laws of balance, harmony, and unity so uniformly and persistently applied through the seriously designed main body of the Exposition.

Bibliographic information