The Analects

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Penguin, Dec 20, 1979 - Religion - 256 pages
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Confucius is one of the most humane, rational, and lucid of moral teachers, concerned not with arcane metaphysics but with practical issues of life and conduct. What is virtue? What sort of life is most conducive to happiness? How should the state be ruled? What is the proper relationship between human beings and their environment? 

In this classic translation of The Analects by Arthur Waley, the questions Confucius addressed two and a half millennia ago remain as relevant as ever.

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The Analects of Confucius

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Simon Leys is the pseudonym of Pierre Ryckmans (Chinese studies, Univ. of Sydney), who tells us in the foreword that he uses a literary pen name because his intention here was to produce a "writer's ... Read full review

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Contents

Acknowledgement
7
Introduction
9
BOOK I
59
BOOK II
63
BOOK III
67
BOOK IV
72
BOOK V
76
BOOK VI
81
BOOK XIV
124
BOOK XV
132
BOOK XVI
138
BOOK XVII
143
BOOK XVIII
149
BOOK XIX
153
BOOK XX
158
Events in the Life of Confucius
161

BOOK VII
86
BOOK VIII
92
BOOK IX
96
BOOK X
101
BOOK XI
106
BOOK XII
112
BOOK XIII
118
Chronology
195
The Disciples as They Appear in the Analects
196
The Lun yu
220
Textual Notes
234
Works Cited
235
Glossary
236
Copyright

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About the author (1979)

Confucius (551-479 BC), though of noble descent, was born in humble circumstances. He believed that politics is only an extension of morals, and spent ten years travelling through the various states of China spreading his ideas. When he realised that there was no way of converting the feudal rulers to his way of thinking he returned to Lu and spent the rest of his life there teaching his pupils.

D.C. Lau read Chinese at the University of Hong Kong, and, in 1946, he went to Glasgow, where he read philosophy. In 1950 he entered the School of Oriental and African Studies in London to teach Chinese philosophy. After lecturing in Chinese philosophy at the University of London he returned to Hong Kong, where he is a Professor at the Chinese University.


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