Classical Hinduism

Front Cover
Gregorian Biblical BookShop, 1982 - Religion - 525 pages
Hinduism has a span of three thousand years of history in which various forms of religious experience took shape and grew into a wide and rich variety of myths and cults, beliefs and practise, doctrines and disciplines, which have nurtured millions of Hindus throughout the ages. The exact ides of Hinduism is hard to define since the beliefs and practices of the Hindus differ greatly from one period of history to another, and within a given period, from one region to another, and within a given region, from one class of society to another. In its traditional form the chief distinguishing features of its development are Vedism, Brahmanism, classical Hinduism, Sectarian Hinduism, Medieval Hinduism, Modern Hinduism and Contemporary Hinduism. These developments should not be considered as water-tight compartments, for they merge into one another. Hinduism has shown in its long history a marked propensity to assimilate rather than exclude various religious currents which once used to be considered alien to its own orthodoxy; this feature divides sharply Hinduism from other religions, for example, from Islam and to a certain extent at least in its beginning, Judaism; These religions in their strict form reject as false all other religious beliefs and practices.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

3 MEDITATION IN THE BHAGAVADGÏTÄ
258
4 MEDITATION IN THE YOGASÜTRAS
264
5 MEDITATION IN THE PURÄNAS
268
6 MEDITATION ACCORDING TO ÄCÄRYAS
277
CONCLUSION
286
MYSTICISM
290
1 MYSTICISM OF THE SPIRITUAL SELF OF MAN
291
2 MYSTICISM OF THE ABSOLUTE THE SOLE REALITY
309

2 VEDIC IDEA OF GOD
40
3 ABSOLUTISM IN THE UPANISHADS
51
4 THEISM IN THE UPANISHADS
55
5 THEISM IN THE BHAGAVADGÏTÄ
60
6 TRIMÜRTI TRINITY
63
INCARNATIONS
69
II TEN PRINCIPAL INCARNATIONS
72
III BHAGAVADGITAS TEACHING oN INCARNATION
84
IV HINDU CLASSICAL THEOLOGIES oF INCARNATION
95
V CONTEMPORARY HINDU THEOLOGIES OF INCARNATION
102
THE CONCEPTION OF MAN
112
2 THE UPANISHADIC CONCEPTION OF MAN
121
3 THE EPIC IDEA OF MAN
126
4 THE BHAGAVADGÏTÄS CONCEPT Or MAN
129
CONCLUSION
134
PRIESTHOOD
136
I THE PRIEST IN THE VEDIC SOCIAL STRUCTURE
137
II THE FUNCTION OF THE BRÄHMAN PRIEST
145
CONCLUSION
155
WORSHIP SACRIFICES AND SACRAMENTS
157
I VEDIC SACRIFICES
159
II DOMESTIC SITES AND SACRAMENTS
174
III THE MEANING OF HINDU SACRIFICE
185
IV THE WORSHIP OF DEITIES PÜJA
188
V THE GENERAL CHARACTERISTICS OF THE HINDU RITUAL
192
CONCLUSION
204
PRAYER
206
1 VEDIC PRAYER
207
2 THE HINDU MANTRA
216
3 THE HINDU APA
220
4 HYMNS OF PRAISE STUTI STOTRA STAVA
222
5 HINDU KÏRTANA AND BHAJANA
229
6 PRAYERS OF LOVE OF GOD BHAKTI
233
7 CONLUSION
240
MEDITATION
243
1 MEDITATION IN THE UPANISHADS
244
2 MEDITATION IN THE MAHÄBHÄRATA
250
3 MYSTICISM OF LOVE OF GOD
318
CONCLUSION
329
MORALITY
332
1 THE MEANING ON THE TERM DHARMA
334
2 THE SOURCES OF DHARMA
348
3 THE CLASSIFICATION OF DHARMA
352
4 THE TEACHING OF THE Bhagavadgïtä ON DHARMA
358
CONCLUSION
364
MONASTICISM
368
1 TECHNICAL TERMS FOR HINDU ASCETICS
369
2 HINDU ASCETICISM IN ITS ORIGINS
375
3 ÄPASTAMBA DHARMA SÜTRAS
379
4 THE LAWS OF MANU
386
5 THE TEACHING OF THE MAHÄBHÄRATA
393
6 THE TEACHING OF THE BHAGAVADGÏTÄ
396
7 THE TEACHING OF THE SANNYÄSA UPANISHADS
402
8 VOWS OF THE SANNYÄSIN
406
CONCLUSION
409
SALVATION
411
I RELIGIOUS TERMS FOR SALVATION ETYMOLOGY AND SEMANTICS
412
II THE EVIL FROM WHICH SALVATION IS SOUGHT
426
III VEDIC IDEA OF SALVATION
434
IV SALVATION IN THE UPANISHADS
442
V SALVATION IN THE MAHÄBHÄRATA
451
VI SALVATION IN THE BHAGAVADGÏTÄ
457
CONCLUSION
464
WAYS OF SALVATION
466
1 THE WAY OF WORKS
468
2 THE WAY OF KNOWLEDGE
477
3 THE WAY OF LOVE OR GOD
484
4 WAYS OF SALVATION IN THE NONDUALIST SCHOOL
492
5 WAYS OF SALVATION IN THE THEIST SCHOOL
502
6 DIFFERENCES BETWEEN THE TWO SCHOOLS
504
SELECT BIBLIOGRAPHY
507
INDEX OF CLASSICAL AND MODERN AUTHORS
521
INDEX OF SUBJECTS
523
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 37 - And he is that great unborn Self, who consists of knowledge, is surrounded by the Pranas, the ether within the heart. In it there reposes the ruler of all, the lord of all, the king of all.
Page 35 - Let us adore the supremacy of that divine sun, the god-head who illuminates all, who recreates all, from whom all proceed, to whom all must return, whom we invoke to direct our understandings aright in our progress towards his holy seat.

About the author (1982)

Mariasusai Dhavamony is Professor of Christian theology and phenomenology of religions at the Pontifical Gregorian University, Rome.

Bibliographic information