Freedom of Speech: A Reference Guide to the United States Constitution

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Greenwood Publishing Group, 2004 - Law - 176 pages
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The Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) provides workers with minimum wage, overtime pay, and child labor protections. The FLSA covers most, but not all, private and public sector employees. In addition, certain employers and employees are exempt from coverage. Provisions of the FLSA that are of current interest to Congress include the basic minimum wage, subminimum wage rates, exemptions from overtime and the minimum wage for persons who provide companionship services, the exemption for employees in computer-related occupations, compensatory time in lieu of overtime pay, and break time for nursing mothers. The National Labor Relations Act (NLRA) recognizes the right of employees to engage in collective bargaining through representatives of their own choosing. By "encouraging the practice and procedure of collective bargaining," the Act attempts to mitigate and eliminate labor-related obstructions to the free flow of commerce. Although union membership has declined dramatically since the 1950s, congressional interest in the NLRA remains significant. This book provides an overview of both the Fair Labor Standards Act and the National Labor Relations Act with a focus on coverage, amendments and policy.
 

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Contents

IV
1
VI
5
VII
8
VIII
11
IX
23
X
27
XI
28
XII
38
XXIV
79
XXV
81
XXVI
82
XXVII
98
XXVIII
118
XXIX
124
XXX
127
XXXI
129

XIII
40
XIV
43
XV
44
XVI
50
XVII
56
XVIII
62
XIX
67
XX
69
XXI
70
XXII
72
XXIII
78
XXXII
130
XXXIII
137
XXXIV
144
XXXV
146
XXXVI
147
XXXVII
149
XXXVIII
151
XXXIX
167
XL
173
Copyright

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About the author (2004)

KEITH WERHAN is the Geoffrey C. Bible & Murray H. Bring Professor of Constitutional Law at Tulane Law School. He specializes in Constitutional Law, the First Amendment, and Administrative Law, and has written widely in those areas. Professor Werhan entered the practice of law in Washington, D.C., first with a private law firm and later with the U.S. Department of Justice.

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