Travels in the Ottoman empire, Egypt, and Persia, undertaken by order of the government of France, during the first six years of the Republic. Transl. Vol.1,2 [in 1].

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Page 73 - ... witty, intelligent, and rich. Here I no longer find that mixture of pride and meanness which characterizes the Greeks of Constantinople, and of a great part of the Levant; that timidity, that cowardice, which is occasioned by perpetual fear, that bigotry which prevents no crime. What...
Page 100 - Being arrived at the husband's house, she is perfumed and placed on an elevated seat, prepared on purpose for her. All the women not belonging to the family go out a moment after, and there no longer remain any but the female relations of the contracted couple. The bridegroom, during this time, is in another apartment, where his relations, and some young men whom he has invited, perfume him, dress him in his richest clothes, and sing songs analogous to the ceremony. A moment after, all the men, accompanied...
Page 135 - Ah"eady had the janizaries reĽ fufed to march ; already did the immenfe number of inhabitants of CONSTANTINOPLE hold out their arms to him whom they confidered as their deliverer, as the defender of their rights: the majority of the great were devoted to his...
Page 112 - ... exposing her to sale, because most of the rich men are always ready to make pecuniary sacrifices in order to procure such for themselves. The men in place and the ambitious are likewise eager to purchase them in order to lay them at the feet of their sovereign or present them to their protectors, and place about them women who, being indebted to them for their elevation, may endeavour through gratitude to contribute to that of their former masters.
Page 66 - ... when we were obliged to lie down in a place which was infefted by them. " It was not enough for the fleas and bugs to prevent us from fleeping ; we were, befides, lighted by a lamp which was burning before the image of the Virgin, as is the practice night and day in'all the Greek houfes of the Levant.
Page 114 - ... raised by fortune and intrigue, from the rank of slave or that of a simple private person to the one they occupy, are for the Turks an ever active incentive, which animates and encourages them. In all administrative and military places talents are held in no estimation, they are almost always useless and even frequently dangerous. " The prejudices of Europe, in regard to birth, not being...
Page 121 - ... slaves to wait on his wife, and the latter is very unskilful if she does not soon convert into trinkets the greater part of the husband's fortune. Besides, when a divorce takes place between a married couple, the wife keeps her jewels and her wardrobe, independently of the other effects stipulated in the contract of marriage. The wife takes her meals alone, or with the mother and the female relations of the husband, who are with her in the harem. He eats with his father and the male relations...
Page 169 - I , cuinos by the Pelasgi, took refuge in Sparta, where they were kindly received. Lands even were given to them, and they were married to girls of the country. But as these strangers, ever restless and ambitious, were, in the sequel, convicted of endeavouring to seize on the sovereign authority, they were apprehended, and condemned to death. Love inspired one ot their women with a trick that succeeded.
Page 120 - ... veiled; because the law exempts her from going to the mosque; because she has in her own house baths which she uses at pleasure; and because she is surrounded by female slaves who watch over her, and female relatives who counteract her inclinations for society if such exist. To please her husband, to detain him in the harem as long as his affairs permit, to take care of her children, to occupy herself with her dress and very little with her family, to pray at the hours prescribed by religion,...
Page 99 - On the day of the wedding, she dresses herself in the richest clothes that she can procure, and covers herself with jewels, pearls, and pieces of money, which the relations very often borrow. They try to embellish the young lady's face, by colouring it with red, white, and blue, and by painting her eye-brows and eye-lids black. In certain countries, they next colour the arms and hands with black, paint the nails yellow or black, and the feet an orange colour yellow...

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