Music and Some Highly Musical People: Containing Brief Chapters on. A description of music. The music of nature. A glance at the history of music, [and]. The power, beauty, and uses of music, following which are given sketches of the lives of remarkable musicians of the colored race

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Lee and Shepard, 1878 - African American musicians - 353 pages
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Page 259 - By the rivers of Babylon, there we sat down, yea, we wept, when we remembered Zion. We hanged our harps upon the willows in the midst thereof. For there they that carried us away captive required of us a song ; and they that wasted us required of us mirth, saying, Sing us one of the songs of Zion.
Page 19 - I have seen A curious child, who dwelt upon a tract Of inland ground, applying to his ear The convolutions of a smooth-lipped shell ; To which, in silence hushed, his very soul Listened intensely ; and his countenance soon Brightened with joy ; for from within were heard Murmurings, whereby the monitor expressed Mysterious union with its native sea.
Page 87 - Nothing is here for tears, nothing to wail Or knock the breast, no weakness, no contempt. Dispraise or blame, nothing but well and fair. And what may quiet us in a death so noble.
Page 55 - Then, crown'd again, their golden harps they took, — Harps ever tuned, that glittering by their side Like quivers hung, — and with preamble sweet Of charming symphony they introduce Their sacred song, and waken raptures high : No voice exempt ; no voice but well could join Melodious part, such concord is in heaven.
Page 207 - I knew a very wise man so much of Sir Chr — 's sentiment, that he believed if a man were permitted to make all the ballads, he need not care who should make the laws of a nation.
Page 12 - The reason hereof is an admirable facility which music hath to express and represent to the mind, more inwardly than any other sensible mean, the very standing, rising, and falling, the very steps and inflections every way, the turns and varieties of all passions whereunto the mind is subject...
Page 208 - No good of worth sublime will heaven permit To light on man as from the passing air ; The lamp of genius, though by nature lit, If not protected, pruned, and fed with care, Soon dies or runs to waste with fitful glare...
Page 25 - Wherefore didst thou flee away secretly, and steal away from me; and didst not tell me, that I might have sent thee away with mirth, and with songs, with tabret, and with harp ? 28 And hast not suffered me to kiss my sons and my daughters?
Page 26 - And David and all Israel played before God with all their might, and with singing, and with harps, and with psalteries, and with timbrels, and with cymbals, and with trumpets.
Page 191 - THERE is in souls a sympathy with sounds, And as the mind is pitched the ear is pleased With melting airs or martial, brisk or grave. Some chord in unison with what we hear Is touched within us, and the heart replies.

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