Large Lakes: Ecological Structure and Function

Front Cover
Max M. Tilzer, Colette Serruya
Springer Science & Business Media, Dec 6, 2012 - Science - 691 pages
The vast majority of the world's lakes are small in size and short lived in geological terms. Only 253 of the thousands of lakes on this planet have surface areas larger than 500 square kilometers. At first sight, this statistic would seem to indicate that large lakes are relatively unimportant on a global scale; in fact, however, large lakes contain the bulk of the liquid surface freshwater of the earth. Just Lake Baikal and the Laurentian Great Lakes alone contain more than 38% of the world's total liquid freshwater. Thus, the large lakes of the world accentuate an important feature of the earth's freshwater reserves-its extremely irregular distribution. The energy crisis of the 1970s and 1980s made us aware of the fact that we live on a spaceship with finite, that is, exhaustible resources. On the other hand, the energy crisis led to an overemphasis on all the issues concerning energy supply and all the problems connected with producing new energy. The energy crisis also led us to ignore strong evidence suggesting that water of appropriate quality to be used as a resouce will be used up more quickly than energy will. Although in principle water is a "renewable resource," the world's water reserves are diminishing in two fashions, the effects of which are multiplicative: enhanced consumption and accelerated degradation of quality.
 

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Contents

Specific Properties of Large Lakes
39
Mechanisms
47
On Internal Seiches and Noisy Current Fields
81
Jean Pierre Pelletier Institut de Limnologie 75 av de Corzent F74203
105
Spring Mixing Depth as a Determinant of Annual
125
Behavior of a MediumSized Basin Connected to
133
Effects of Water Level Fluctuation on the Structure
156
PARTICLE TRANSPORT AND CHEMICAL FLUXES
173
Ecology of Melosira Species in the Great Lakes of Africa
414
A Case Study in Lake
428
Patterns in Zooplankton Distribution and Their Causes
440
Seasonal Succession of Rotifers in Large Lakes
459
FooDWEB STRUCTURES AND TROPHIC INTERACTIONS
475
Bacterial Production and the Flow of Organic Matter
489
Seasonal Changes in Methane Hydrogen and Carbon
503
Contribution of Picoplankton to the Grazer Food Chain
526

Significance of Sediment Resuspension and Particle
196
Time Scales of Sediment Focusing in Large Lakes
210
Characterizing Autochthonous Iron Particles
224
Pathways and Residence Times of Radiotracers in Lake
245
Biological Transfer and Sedimentation of Chernobyl
265
Lacustrine Carbonates as Geochemical Archives
288
Sedimentation and Eutrophication History of Austrian
316
PRODUCTION PERIODICITY AND DISTRIBUTION
337
Gerhard Heinz Institut für Umweltphysik Im Neuenheimer Feld 366
366
Effects of Latitude on Phytoplankton Composition
368
Stoichiometric Measures
403
Significance of Heterotrophic Nanoflagellates and Ciliates
540
Charles E Herdendorf 1507 Cleveland Rd East Suite 421 Huron Ohio
548
On Pelagic Food Web Interactions in Large Water Bodies
556
Lake Trophic Status and the Development of
580
a Trophic Gradient
592
Strength of ZooplanktonPhytoplankton Coupling
615
Pontoporeia hoyia Direct Trophic Link between Spring
632
Fish Predation Effects on Plankton Community Structure
645
ECOLOGICAL STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION IN LARGE
661
Index
675
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