Memoirs of the Court of King Charles the First, Volume 2

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Longman, Rees, Orme, Brown, Green, and Longman, 1833 - Great Britain
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Page 257 - I may possibly make a shift (upon the defensive) to spin out time until you come to assist me. Wherefore I command and conjure you, by the duty and affection which I know you bear me, that all new enterprises laid aside, you immediately march, according to your first intention, with all your force to the relief of York.
Page 260 - ... a plain cloth suit which seemed to have been made by an ill country tailor ; his linen was plain, and not very clean, and I remember a speck or two of blood upon his little band, which was not much larger than his collar ; his hat was without a hatband ; his stature was of a good size ; his sword stuck close to his side ; his countenance swollen and reddish ; his voice sharp and untunable, and his eloquence full of fervour.
Page 260 - I came one morning into the House well clad, and perceived a gentleman speaking, whom I knew not, very ordinarily apparelled, for it was a plain cloth suit, which seemed to have been made by an ill country tailor. His linen was plain, and' not very clean ; and I remember a speck or two of blood upon his little band, which was not much larger than his collar. His hat was without a hatband ; his stature was of a good size ; his sword stuck close to his side, his countenance swollen and reddish, his...
Page 233 - When there was any overture or hope of peace, he would be more erect and vigorous, and exceedingly solicitous to press any thing which he thought might promote it ; and, sitting among his friends, often, after a deep silence, and frequent sighs, would with a shrill and sad accent, ingeminate the word peace, peace...
Page 185 - The standard was blown down, the same night it had been set up, by a very strong and unruly wind, and could not be fixed again in a day or two, till the tempest was allayed. This was the melancholy state of the King's affairs when the standard was set up.
Page 287 - God may in due time avenge his own cause. Though I must avow to all my friends that he that will stay with me at this time must expect and resolve, either to die for a good cause, or, which is worse, to live as miserable in the maintaining it, as the violence of insulting rebels can make him.
Page 70 - Being on his kneos, he is delivered to the Keeper of the Black Rod, to be prisoner till he was cleared of these crimes the House of Commons had charged him •with. He offered to speak, but was commanded to be gone without a word.
Page 196 - I have eaten his bread, and served him near thirty years, and will not do so base a thing as to forsake him; and choose rather to lose my life (which I am sure I shall do) to preserve and defend those things which are against my conscience to preserve and defend : for I will deal freely with you, I have no reverence for the bishops, for whom this quarrel [subsists.]" It was not a time to dispute; and his affection to the church had never been suspected.
Page 98 - The only imperfections which he had, that were known to me, were his want of bodily health, and a carelessness (or rather roughness) not to oblige any ; and his mishaps in this last action were, that he groaned under the public envy of the nobles, served a mild and a gracious prince, who knew not how to be, or be made great...
Page 196 - ... so devoted to them, that they had all provisions brought to them without the least trouble; whereas, on the other side, the people were so disaffected to the king's party, that they had carried away, or hid, all their provisions, insomuch as there was neither meat for man or horse ; and the very smiths hid themselves, that they might not be compelled to shoe horses, of which in those stony ways there was great need.

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