Transnational Television, Cultural Identity and Change: When STAR Came to India

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SAGE, Dec 6, 2003 - History - 321 pages
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When STAR TV began broadcasting into India in 1992, it was at the vanguard of an influx of transnational television networks trying to tap into one of the world's largest consumer markets. STAR's Western programming, bold marketing, and its later ownership by one of the world's largest media conglomerates, Rupert Murdoch's News Corporation, saw thename inextricably linked with the debate surrounding cultural change in India in the 1990s.

This book is not just a history of the development of TV in India, nor solely an exploration of its impact. It measures cultural change by looking at changing perceptions of Indianness, or the understanding of what it means to call oneself an Indian, and the role of transnational TV in the process of defining, creating and maintaining that identity.

 

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Contents

List of Abbreviations
8
Redefining Indian Television
49
Cultural Strategies of Identity
87
Cultural Change in India
111
Mediating Identity Transnational
147
Shifting Cultural Space and
181
Cleaving India New Oppositions
209
India According to Miss World
239
The Dimensions of Cultural Change
265
Summary of Focus Groups
293
First and Second Generation Interviewees
298
Index
315
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About the author (2003)

Melissa Butcher is a Research Fellow at the Research Institute for Asia and the Pacific, University of Sydney, working on transnational corporate cultures in Asia and Australia.

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