Laws of the Game: How the Principles of Nature Govern Chance

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Princeton University Press, 1993 - Science - 347 pages
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Using game theory and examples of actual games people play, Nobel laureate Manfred Eigen and Ruthild Winkler show how the elements of chance and rules underlie all that happens in the universe, from genetic behavior through economic growth to the composition of music. To illustrate their argument, the authors turn to classic games - backgammon, bridge, and chess - and relate them to physical, biological, and social applications of probability theory and number theory. Further, they have invented, and present here, more than a dozen playable games derived from scientific models for equilibrium, selection, growth, and even the composition of RNA. These games, complete with instructions and boards in color, are a source of learning and entertainment.
 

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Contents

V
1
VI
3
VII
6
VIII
19
IX
30
X
49
XI
67
XII
69
XVIII
199
XIX
216
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XXI
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XXII
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XXIII
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XXIV
283
XXV
298

XIII
103
XIV
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XV
173
XVI
175
XVII
178
XXVI
306
XXVII
331
XXVIII
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About the author (1993)

Manfred Eigen and Ruthild Winkler are scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry. In 1967 Eigen received the Nobel Prize for chemistry.

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