Tolerance and diversity in Ireland, north and south

Front Cover
Iseult Honohan, Nathalie Rougier
Oxford University Press, Nov 1, 2015 - Social Science - 238 pages
This book examines the treatment of cultural and religious diversity - indigenous and immigrant - on both sides of the Irish border in order to analyse the current state of tolerance and to consider the kinds of policies that may support integration while respecting diversity. The first two sections focus on the spheres of education, civic life and politics, including chapters on specific groups (e.g. travellers and immigrants), as well as on the communal divisions in Northern Ireland. Later chapters reflect on the Irish experience of diversity, and consider what may be the most appropriate approaches and discourses to deal with diversity, whether these involve tolerance, recognition or transformative reconciliation. This book will appeal to academics and students in sociology, politics, education, social psychology and Irish studies; it will also be of interest to general readers interested in society, education and politics in Ireland, North and South.
 

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Contents

List of figures and tables
When you actually talk to them recognising
the role
Irelands
policy and practice in Northern Ireland
Tolerance of religious and cultural diversity in Irish
Minority and majority community integration in Northern
immigrants in the Irish
intolerance and hate crime
Prejudice and intolerance in Ulster
Acknowledging religious and cultural diversity in
Taking intolerant liberalism seriously
Toleration respect and recognition in Northern Ireland
Conclusion
Index
Copyright

Academic truth and the perpetuation of negative attitudes

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About the author (2015)

Iseult Honohan is a Senior Lecturer in the School of Politics and International Relations at University College Dublin Nathalie Rougier is a Postdoctoral Researcher in the School of Politics and International Relations at University College Dublin

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