War Vegetable Gardening and the Home Storage of Vegetables ...

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National War Garden Commission, 1918 - Farm produce - 31 pages
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Love it ! Love it ! Love it! It is as valuable today as it was yesterday. This is something any beginner could use who has never gardened before. Thanks for going to the trouble

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Page 7 - Until the seed germinate the hotbed should be kept shaded to hold moisture. This can be done by spreading over the sash strips of old carpet, heavy cloth or newspapers. After germination strong light will be needed. The plants must be watered each morning on clear days, and the sash left partially open for ventilation, as it is necessary to dry the foliage to prevent mildew. Proper ventilation is essential to the production of strong, healthy plants. The sash should be raised during the warmest part...
Page 4 - Detailed instructions for canning, drying, pickling and other forms of conservation are given in the Home Manual on these subjects issued by this Commission. Sunshine In the location of a garden it is not always possible to choose conditions as to sunlight. It is important, therefore, that in the arrangement of the various varieties of vegetables which are to be planted, due care should be given to providing the greatest exposure to the sun for those crops which need it most. Those plants which must...
Page 25 - Instead of a stovepipe a wooden flue, made of old boards or parts of boxes, may be used. Bins and boxes should be placed on slats to lift them from the floor and allow circulation. For this same purpose bins and boxes should be at least 1 or 2 inches from the wall.
Page 8 - ... short, Mr. Rosenwald, of a philosophical, categorical, and analytical system of investigation into the operation of correct and irrefragable principles as contradistinguished from the operation of illusory and fallacious principles, that disqualifies you from perceiving that I act for the best, and with a view to the production of the largest possible amount of good attainable under existing circumstances. If you are determined on going, Mr. Rosenwald — if you will not stop and chat with me...
Page 28 - On these plates place rafters. Board up completely with the exception of a place for the door. The whole should be covered with dirt and sod, and in cold climates added protection should be given by a layer of straw, fodder or similar material. Ventilate with a flue. A dirt floor is best, as some moisture is desirable. This form of storage is especially good for the joint use of several families. On a more pretentious scale cellars of this nature may be made of brick, stone or concrete. Such cellars...
Page 10 - Sat box. To test plant 25 to 50 seed of each variety in an indoor seed box, or place between moist blotters or cloth between two plates. (Fig. 5.) Germination should take place within 2 to 8 days and the number of seedlings which grow will show the percentage of germination. The...
Page 6 - Compost is especially desirable when quick growth is wanted. Compost is thoroughly rotted manure or organic material. It is prepared from six to twelve months before being used, by putting the manure and other material in piles having perpendicular sides and flat tops. These piles are usually from 2 to 4 feet high and 6 to 8 feet long. Besides the usual waste of garden rubbish, there is a large waste of leaves, weeds and the skins and other unused portions of fruits and vegetables. These should all...
Page 2 - Carrots, yż row, followed by Corn Turnips, followed by Bush Beans Potatoes, followed by Spinach Spinach, followed by Potatoes Cabbage, with Lettuce and Radishes between, followed by Carrots Beans, Bush Lima Chard, % row; Parsley...
Page 15 - Beets Sow seed rather thickly in row, using 1 oz. to 50 feet, but thin the young plants by pulling until the survivors are 4 inches apart. The pulled plants make fine greens for cooking or canning. Brussels Sprouts Grown like cabbage. Cabbage Set plants from indoor seed boxes or pots I5 inches apart in rows, the rows being 30 inches apart.
Page 6 - ... garden next spring. Destroy all plants which are diseased. The compost pile should be built up in alternate layers of vegetable refuse a foot thick and earth an inch or more thick. The earth helps to rot the vegetable matter when mixed with it. The top of the pile should be left flat that the rain may enter and help in the process of decay. If the pile can be forked over once a month when not frozen and the contents well mixed together, they will decay quite rapidly and be in good usable condition...

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