Body, Text, and Science: The Literacy of Investigative Practices and the Phenomenology of Edith Stein

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Springer Science & Business Media, Dec 1, 2013 - Science - 318 pages
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What is "scientific" about the natural and human sciences? Precisely this: the legibility of our worlds and the distinctive reading strategies that they provoke. That account of the essence of science comes from Edith Stein, who as HusserI's assistant 1916-1918 labored in vain to bring his massive Ideen to publication, and then went on to propose her own solution to the problem of finding a unified foundation for the social and physical sciences. Stein argued that human bodily life itself affords direct access to the interplay of natural causality, cultural motivation, and personal initiative in history and technology. She developed this line of approach to the sciences in her early scholarly publications, which too soon were overshadowed by her religious lectures and writings, and eventually were obscured by National Socialism's ideological attack on philosophies of empathy. Today, as her church prepares to declare Stein a saint, her secular philosophical achievements deserve another look.
 

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Contents

The Munich Phenomenologists
9
Husserls Early Treatments of Intersubjectivity
49
Lectures on Basic Problems of Phenomenology
62
The Logos Article and the First Book of the Ideen
68
Edith Steins Hermeneutic Theory
90
Analysis of the Constitution of Individuals
108
Analysis of the Empathy of Personal Types
131
viii
144
Interpretations of Edith Stein
184
Interpretations of Stein According to Deployment of Is
216
Science as Literacy
222
Psychoanalytic Feminism as the Science of Science
241
Realist Feminism as the Science of Science
250
Dissertations and Theses on Edith Stein
268
Critique of Bordos Empathy Theory
279
Index
308

Anonymous Textual Production
151
Philosophical and Theological Autographs
170

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