Venizelos

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Houghton Mifflin, 1920 - Greece - 384 pages
 

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Page 27 - European policy is invariably the maintenance of the status quo, and you will do nothing for the subject races unless we, by taking the initiative, make you realize that helping us against the Turks is the lesser of two evils.
Page 38 - ... therefore a rebel — because my mother was born under the Turkish flag. At the end of this revolution, I returned again to my town and resumed my legal profession. I did not have time, however, to go far with it; for I had to take arms again and go to the mountains. Soon I reached the point where I had to decide whether I ought to be a lawyer by profession and a revolutionary at intervals, or a revolutionary by profession and a lawyer at intervals.
Page 314 - In taking part in this world-wide war, at the side of the democratic nations, which have been brought together in a common cause, in a truly holy alliance, by Germany's claims to the empire of the world, whose clients are our two hereditary enemies, we shall not only regain the national territories we have lost, we shall not only re-establish our honour as a nation, we shall not only effectively defend our national interests at the Congress of Peace and secure our national future, but we...
Page 347 - One may be tempted to raise the objection that a substantial portion of this Greek population has Albanian as its mother tongue, and is consequently, in all probability, of Albanian origin...
Page 234 - I asked for would have been mobilised, and in another nine days, with the abundance of material which we and our Allies had at our disposal, we should have found ourselves with our Army Corps, or even with our one division, in occupation of the Gallipoli peninsula, which was unguarded, ungarrisoned, and unfortified.
Page 208 - ... desire not to offend Germany . . . who proposes, if her ascendancy in the war is complete, to create a Greater Bulgaria extending to the Adriatic as a bulwark against Slavism, the Germans having recently discovered that the Bulgars are not Slavs but Tartars. Why should we have so much regard for a Power whose aim is to strengthen by every possible means the two chief foes of Hellenism, Turkey and Bulgaria...
Page 314 - A nation which for no less than three thousand years has passed through such great trials without disappearing, a nation which only yesterday recorded the victories of 1912 and 1913, a nation which, although betrayed by its rulers, succeeded in finding within itself sufficient moral strength to create a new State, and raise a new army, and write, as I have often said, some of the brightest pages of our military history, I am unshakably convinced that such a nation still conceals within itself enough...
Page 293 - ... evident that the German authorities and King Constantine were on amicable terms with each other. During the last three months of the year the friction between the King and the Allies was very acute. Owing to the menacing movements of the Greek regiments that were still mobilised, the Allies demanded the surrender of a quantity of munitions, the use of certain railways, the expulsion of certain pro-German agents, various limitations of Greek troop-movements, and other concessions. The King's Government...
Page 313 - ... every way to Bulgaria. But I should, at all events, have recognised that it was a conservative policy I had to deal with. But let me repeat, Gentlemen, to return to the point at issue, this so-called conservative policy, what did it conserve, and what did it not betray ? The ten months' mobilisation, the Bulgarian invasion of Eastern Macedonia, the laying waste of Greek Macedonia, the imprisonment of an Army Corps — are all these not equivalent to an unsuccessful war ? The annihilation of Hellenism...
Page 244 - May 31 (June 13) the people have approved my policy and given me their confidence ; and the electorate knew that the foundation of my policy was that we should not allow Bulgaria to crush Serbia and expand overmuch so as to crush us to-morrow. At this point therefore you cannot depart from this policy : unless of course you are determined to set aside the Constitution, in which case you must say so clearly, abrogating the Constitution and assuming full responsibility by a Royal Decree.

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