Bhagavad-Gita: The Song of God

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Penguin Group (Canada), 1981 - Philosophy - 284 pages
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Uses the beauty of verse to express the highest truths of Vedanta. Includes an introduction to the Gita, and a study of non-violence versus the need to fight a just war.

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This book is really hyped up. Although it was decent, it did not inspire me to the max. Not concrete enough for my tastes, but it does have virtue. It did not provoke a sublime spiritual experience, but it is good to have finally read a translation of such an esteemed
religious classic.

Contents

Translators Preface page
9
Gita and Mahabharata
23
THE SOBBOW OF ABJUNA
30
Copyright

7 other sections not shown

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About the author (1981)

Christopher Isherwood, born in Cheshire, England, in 1904, wrote both novels and nonfiction. He was a lifelong friend of W.H. Auden and wrote several plays with him, including Dog Beneath the Skin and The Ascent of F6. He lived in Germany from 1928 until 1933 and his writings during this period described the political and social climate of pre-Hitler Germany. Isherwood immigrated to the United States in 1939 and became a U.S. citizen in 1946. He lived in California, working on film scripts and adapting plays for television. The musical Cabaret is based on several of Isherwood's stories and on his play, I Am a Camera. His other works include Mr. Norris Changes Trains, about life in Germany in the early 1930s; Down There on a Visit, an autobiographical novel; and Where Joy Resides, published after his death in 1986.

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