Jerome Cardan: The Life of Girolamo Cardano, of Milan, Physician, Volume 1

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Chapman and Hall, 1854 - Science - 328 pages
 

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Page 98 - In contemplating the characters of the eminent persons who appeared about this era, nothing is more interesting and instructive than to remark the astonishing combination, in the same minds of the highest intellectual endowments, with the most deplorable aberrations of the understanding ; and even, in numberless instances, with the most childish superstitions of the multitude.
Page 261 - ... through Milan of having discovered some new rules in Algebra. But take notice, that if you break your faith with me, I shall certainly not break promise with you (for it is not my custom); nay, even undertake to visit you with more than I had promised.
Page 209 - You saie truth. But harke, what meaneth that hastie knockyng at the doore? Scholar. It is a messenger. Master. What is the message? Tel me in mine eare. Yea, sir, is that the matter? Then is there no remedie, but that I must neglect all studies and teaching, for to withstande these daungers? My fortune is not so good, to have quiete tyme to teache.
Page iv - ... carried their research farther than the perusal of a work or two. Commonly they have been content with a reading of his book on his own Life, which is no autobiography, but rather a garrulous disquisition upon himself, written by an old man when his mind was affected by much recent sorrow. In that work Cardan reckoned that he had published one hundred and thirty-one books, and that he was leaving behind him in manuscript one hundred and eleven. It is only by a steady search among his extant works,...
Page 210 - ... necessary for all sortes of men. Geometries verdicte. All fresshe fine wittes by me are filed All grosse dull wittes wishe me exiled : Thoughe no mannes witte reject will I, Yet as they be, I wyll them...
Page 209 - Master. I am inforced to make an eande of this mater: But yet will I promise you, that whiche you shall chalenge of me, when you see me at better laiser: That I will teache you the whole arte of universall rootes. And the extraction of rootes in all square surdes: with the demonstration of theim, and all the former woorkes. If I might have been quietly permitted to reste but a little while longer, I had determined not to have ceased till I had ended all these thinges at large. But now, farewell....
Page 209 - But harke, what meaneth that hastie knockyng at the doore? SCHOLAR. It is a messenger. MASTER. What is the message? tel me in mine eare. Yea, sir, is that the matter? Then is there no remedie, but that I must neglect all studies and teaching, for to withstande those daungers. My fortune is not so good, to have quiete tyme to teache.
Page 33 - The day may come when somebody shall teach us how to estimate the sum of human kindness that proceeds from good digestion and a pure state of the...
Page 251 - Tu osserverai quest' altri contratti, Del numer farai due, tal part'a volo, Che l'una, in l'altra, si produca schietto, El terzo cubo delle cose in stolo ; Delle qual poi, per commun precetto, Torrai li lati cubi, insieme gionti, Et cotal somma...
Page v - ... would suppose, I say, that such a man was at the same time one of the profoundest and most fertile geniuses that Italy has produced, and that he made rare and precious discoveries in mathematics and in medicine?

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