The Sichuan Frontier and Tibet: Imperial Strategy in the Early Qing

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University of Washington Press, 2009 - History - 352 pages
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During China's last dynasty, the Qing (1644-1911), the empire's remote, bleak, and politically insignificant Southwest rose to become a strategically vital area. This study of the imperial government's handling of the southwestern frontier illuminates issues of considerable importance in Chinese history and foreign relations: Sichuan's rise as a key strategic area in relation to the complicated struggle between the Zunghar Mongols and China over Tibet, Sichuan's neighbor to the west, and consequent developments in governance and taxation of the area.
 

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Contents

Introduction
3
1 A Humble Beginning 16441696
14
2 A Strategic Turn from the Steppe to Tibet 16961701
36
3 The Formative Era 17011722
64
4 Realignment in the Yongzheng Period 17231735
91
5 The Shaping of Independence in the Qianlong Period 17361795
117
6 The Military Presence in Society and Economy
147
7 The Benefit and Cost of Imperial Strategy
189
Epilogue
226
Abbreviations Used in Notes and Bibliography
243
Notes
245
Glossary
303
Selected Bibliography
311
Index
337
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About the author (2009)

Yingcong Dai is associate professor of history at William Paterson University of New Jersey.

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