The Works of William Robertson ...: History of the reign of the Emperor Charles V

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Cadell and Davies, 1817 - Scotland
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Page 12 - If a man were called to fix the period in the history of the world during which the condition of the human race was most happy and prosperous, he would, without hesitation, name that which elapsed from the death of Domitian to the accession of Commodus.
Page 40 - These privileges were called charters of community, by which he enfranchised the inhabitants, abolished all marks of servitude, and formed them into corporations or bodies politic, to be governed by a council and magistrates of their own nomination. These magistrates...
Page 92 - It led men to a new employment of their faculties, which they found to be agreeable as well as interesting. It accustomed them to exercises and occupations which tended to...
Page 18 - But though the feudal policy seems to be so admirably calculated for defence against the assaults of any foreign power, its provisions for the interior order and tranquillity of society were extremely defective. The principles of disorder and corruption are discernible in that constitution under its best and most perfect form. They soon unfolded themselves, and, spreading with rapidity through every part of the system, produced the most fatal effects. The bond of political union was extremely feeble...
Page 184 - We," said the justiza to the king, in the name of his high-spirited barons, " who are each of us as good, and who are altogether more powerful than you, promise obedience to your government, if you maintain our rights and liberties ; but, if not, not.
Page 282 - The price of books became so high, that persons of a moderate fortune could not afford to purchase them. The countess of Anjou paid for a copy of the Homilies of Haimon, bishop of Halberstadt, two hundred sheep, five quarters of wheat, and the same quantity of rye and millet.
Page 323 - The humane spirit of the Christian religion struggled long with the maxims and manners of the world, and contributed more than any other circumstance to introduce the practice of manumission.
Page 280 - Alfred the • great complained, that from the Humber to the Thames there was not a priest who understood the liturgy in his mother tongue, or who could translate the easiest piece of Latin ; and that from the Thames to the sea, the ecclesiastics were still more ignorant.
Page 86 - These were strengthened by every thing that can affect the senses or touch the heart. The wild exploits of those romantic knights who sallied forth in quest of adventures, are well known, and have been treated with proper ridicule. The political and permanent effects of the spirit of chivalry have been less observed.

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