A Hand-book of the Engrafted Words of the English Language: Embracing the Choice on the Basis of the Hand-book of the Anglo-Saxon Root-words : in Three Parts

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D. Appleton, 1857 - English language - 355 pages
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Page 35 - The consonants are, 6, c, d, f, g, h, j, k, I, m, n, p, q, r, s, t, v, x, z, and w and y beginning a word or syllable.
Page vi - possesses a power of expression such as was never, perhaps, attained by any human tongue. Its altogether intellectual and singularly happy foundation and development has arisen from a surprising alliance between the two noblest languages of antiquity — the German and the Romanesque— the relation of which to each other is well known to be such that the former supplies the material foundation, the latter the abstract notions. Yes, truly, the English language may with good reason call itself a universal...
Page 97 - Rule II. The final consonant of a monosyllable, if preceded by a single vowel, is doubled before a suffix beginning with a vowel ; as, hat, hatter.
Page 35 - These are called consonants ; as, b, c, d, f, g, h, j, k, I, m, n, p, q, r, s, t, v, w, x, z.
Page 109 - England that we now send our calicoep and muslins to India and the east ; yet the words give standing witness that we once imported them thence ; for "calico" is from Calicut, and "muslin" from Moussul, a city in Asiatic Turkey.
Page 39 - There are as many syllables in a word as there are distinct vowel sounds ; as, man, hu-man-i-ty.
Page 109 - Corinth — the guinea, that it was originally coined of gold brought from the African coast so called — camlet that it was woven, at least in' part, of camels' hair. Such lias been the manufacturing progress of England that we now send our calicoes and muslins to India and the East; yet the words give standing witness that we once imported them thence; for calico is from Calicut, and muslin from Moussul, a city in Asiatic Turkey.1
Page v - It possesses, through its abundance of free medial tones, which may be learned indeed, but which no rules can teach, the power of expression such as never perhaps was attained by any human tongue. Its altogether intellectual and singularly happy foundation and development...
Page 97 - Iv. Words ending in er or or, often reject the e or o before a suffix commencing with a vowel ; as, victor, victrix. Words ending in le, preceded by a consonant, reject these letters before the suffix, ly ; as, idle, idly.
Page vi - English people, to rule, in future times, in a still greater degree, in all the corners of the earth. In richness, sound reason, and flexibility, no modern tongue can be compared with it — not even the German, which must shake off many a weakness before it can enter the lists with the English.

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