Schleiermacher's Introductions to the Dialogues of Plato

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J. & J.J. Deighton, 1836 - 432 pages
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Page 13 - ... and those who already share in his knowledge, than for what it can do for those who as yet know nothing. Whoever then will consider what that so exalted preference for oral instruction means and upon what it rests, will find no other ground but this, that in this case the teacher, standing as he does in the presence of the learner, and in living communication with him, can tell every moment what he understands and what not, and thus assist the activity of his understanding when it fails; but...
Page 16 - I mean, as indicating only a state of the reader's mind, according as he elevates himself or not to the condition of one truly sensible of the inward spirit; or if it is still to be referred to Plato himself, it can only be said that immediate instruction was his only esoteric process, while writing was only his exoteric. For in that certainly, after he was first sufficiently assured that his hearers had followed him as he desired, he could express his thoughts purely and perfectly, and perhaps even...
Page 15 - ... the feeling of not having discovered or understood anything. To this end, then, it is requisite that the final object of the investigation be not directly enunciated and laid down in words, a process which might very easily serve to entangle many persons who are glad to rest content, provided only they are in possession of the final result, but that the mind be reduced to the necessity of seeking, and put into the way by which it may find it. The first is done by the mind's being brought to so...
Page 42 - Moreover by the circumstance, that as by the former all the rest are presupposed, so, conversely, many references are to be found throughout to these latter as previously existing; and even looking only to the particular thoughts, they appear in these dialogues still as it were in the first glitter and awkwardness of early youth. And further, these three dialogues are not indeed like those three last, worked up into one whole with a definite purpose and with much art, but notwithstanding, mutually...
Page 403 - qui imprimis de justitia ocere voluisse Platonem, . object, still the form and the manner in which this is done would then be perfectly unmeaning and absurd. It would have been much more natural to introduce the main subject at once, and then, after the internal existence of the state had been described, to say in what the justice and discretion of such a whole consist ; and then the application to the individual mind, and the ethical problems, still unsolved in this point of view, would have resulted...
Page 43 - ... the relation of ideas to actual things. The Phaedrus, Protagoras and Parmenides, have a character of youthfulness quite peculiar. They appear in the first glitter and awkwardness of early youth. They are not worked up into one whole, with a definite purpose, and with much art. In them also are shown the first breathings of what is the basis of all that follows, of logic as the instrument of philosophy, of ideas as its proper object, consequently of the possibility and of the conditions of knowledge....
Page 289 - ... in the same manner with that essential existence. Thus, then, the immortality of the soul is the condition of all true knowledge, as regards men ; and conversely, the reality of knowledge is the ground upon which the immortality of the soul is most certainly and easily understood. Hence, in the former dialogues also, in which knowledge was investigated, immortality was always...
Page 44 - ... not worked up into one whole, with a definite purpose, and with much art. In them also are shown the first breathings of what is the basis of all that follows, of logic as the instrument of philosophy, of ideas as its proper object, consequently of the possibility and of the conditions of knowledge. In the second part, the explanation of knowledge, and of the process of acquiring knowledge, is the predominant subject. At the head of this part stands the Theaetetus beyond the possibility of a...
Page 7 - ... only in secret allusions, and those very difficult to discover. This notion, in itself utterly vague, has shaped itself into the most multifarious forms, and the writings of Plato have been robbed- of sometimes more and sometimes less of their subject-matter, and his genuine wisdom, on the contrary, sought for in secret doctrines which he as good as not at all confided to these writings...
Page 403 - we are to start upon the supposition that the representation of the state is the proper grand object, it would be hardly possible to conceive why the appearance of the contrary is pointedly produced. 2 And even if it could be explained why Plato combined the investigation concerning justice with this grand In his countryman Buhle's " History of Modern Philosophy,

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