Philosophy of Religion

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Roy W. Perrett
Taylor & Francis, 2000 - Philosophy - 386 pages
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This volume is concerned with something that can best be described as Indian philosophy of religion, that is, philosophy of Indian religions. Contrary to popular Western belief, classical Indian philosophy was not indistinguishable from Indian religion - as even a cursory glance at the first three volumes of this series will demonstrate. Religious concerns, though, did motivate the work of many Indian philosophers. However, important differences between the major Western religions and the major Indian religions (Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism) mean that the shape of Indian philosophy is often significantly different from that of Western philosophy of religion. The selections in this volume discuss Indian treatments of topics in the philosophy of religion like the problem of evil, God, theological monism and dualism, atheism, the concept of a perfect being, reason and revelation, rebirth and karma, religious language, religion and politics, ritual and mantra, and the religous determinants of metaphysics
 

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Contents

A Constitutive God An Indian Suggestion
19
Some Arguments in Utpaladeva
33
In Pursuit
59
A DeathBlow to Sankaras NonDualism?
77
Principled Atheism in the Buddhist Scholastic Tradition
107
A Contrastive Study
132
Reason Revelation and Idealism in Sankaras Vedanta
161
The Question of Doctrinalism in the Buddhist Epistemologists
187
Notes Towards a Critique of Buddhist Karmic Theory
253
Inherited Responsibility Karma and Original
269
Imperatives and Religion in India
283
Towards a Pragmatics of Mantra Recitation
309
The Meaninglessness of Ritual
326
Analysis of the Religious Factors in Indian Metaphysics
347
Three Myths about Indian Philosophy
369
Acknowledgments
385

Rebirth
213
The Naturalistic Principle of Karma
231

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About the author (2000)

Perrett taught philosophy at the University of Otago and Victoria University of Wellington before joining the philosophy department at Massey University, where he is senior lecturer.