The American Mind: An Interpretation of American Thought and Character Since the 1880's

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Yale University Press, Jan 1, 1950 - History - 476 pages
In a book written out of a passionate belief in the staying powers of the democratic principles, a noted historian has written a major work that may be described as an interpretation of American thought and character since the 1880s.
"Impressive in its inclusive sweep."--Joseph Wood Krutch, New York Times
 

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Contents

THE NINETEENTHCENTURY AMERICAN
3
THE WATERSHED OF THE NINETIES
41
TRANSITION YEARS IN LITERATURE AND JOURNALISM
55
JOHN FISKE AND THE EVOLUTIONARY PHILOSOPHY
82
WILLIAM JAMES AND THE IMPACT OF PRAGMATISM
91
DETERMINISM IN LITERATURE
108
THE CULT OF THE IRRATIONAL
120
THE TRADITIONALISTS
141
THE LITERATURE OF REVOLT
247
THE TRANSITION IN HISTORICAL LITERATURE
277
TURNER PARRINGTON BEARD
293
TOWARD A NEW SCIENCE OF POLITICS
310
THE APPLICATIONS OF POLITICAL THEORY
336
THE EVOLUTION OF AMERICAN Law
359
POUND AND HOLMES
374
ARCHITECTURE AND SOCIETY
391

RELIGIOUS THOUGHT AND PRACTICE
162
PART II
197
LESTER WARD AND THE SCIENCE OF SOCIETY
199
THORSTEIN VEBLEN AND THE NEW ECONOMICS
227
THE TWENTIETHCENTURY AMERICAN
406
BIBLIOGRAPHY
445
INDEX
469
Copyright

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About the author (1950)

A native of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, who was educated at the University of Chicago, Henry Steele Commager taught history first at New York University and then at Columbia University. Upon his retirement from Columbia in 1956, he moved on to Amherst College. In addition to lecturing at many universities throughout the world, he has been Harmsworth Professor at Oxford University and Pitt Professor at Cambridge University, where he is also an honorary fellow at Peterhouse College. Commager's writings range widely over such topics as education, the Civil War, civil liberties, the Enlightenment, and immigration. Many of his books reflect his keen interest in constitutional history and civil liberties. Commager is also a documentarian, who is said to consider Documents of American History (1934), the 1988 edition of which he coedited with Milton Cantor, to be his most significant contribution.

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