The Best Ghost Stories

Front Cover
Arthur Benjamin Reeve, Joseph Lewis French
Modern Library, 1919 - Ghost stories - 217 pages
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Wast don't write like this story here after

Contents

I
vii
II
3
III
18
IV
31
V
60
VI
79
VII
85
VIII
108
IX
118
X
141
XI
160
XII
170
XIII
177
XIV
188
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Page 219 - This book is a preservation photocopy. It is made in compliance with copyright law and produced on acid-free archival 60# book weight paper which meets the requirements of ANSI/NISO Z39.48-1992 (permanence of paper) Preservation photocopying and binding by Acme Bookbinding...
Page 133 - Singing and murmuring in her feastful mirth, Joying to feel herself alive, Lord over Nature, Lord of the visible earth, Lord of the senses five ; Communing with herself : ' All these are mine, And let the world have peace or wars, Tis one to me.
Page 9 - You have seen her indeed ; for none knew, but Mrs. Veal and myself, that the gown was scoured." And Mrs. Watson owned that she described the gown exactly ; " for," said she,
Page 39 - ... that by which we had entered, no carpet on the floor, and the floor seemed very old, uneven, wormeaten, mended here and there, as was shown by the whiter patches on the wood; but no living being, and no visible place in which a living being could have hidden. As we stood gazing round, the door by which we had entered closed as quietly as it had before opened ; we were imprisoned.
Page 54 - The instincts of the brute creation detect influences deadly to their existence. Man's reason has a sense less subtle, because it has a resisting power more supreme. But enough; do you comprehend my theory?" "Yes, though imperfectly — and I accept any crotchet (pardon the word), however odd, rather than embrace at once the notion of ghosts and hobgoblins we imbibed in our nurseries. Still, to my unfortunate house, the evil is the same. What on earth can I do with the house?" "I will tell you what...
Page 41 - We ought to love each other," was one of the sentences I remember, "for how every one else would execrate us if all was known." Again: "Don't let any one be in the same room with you at night — you talk in your sleep." And again: "What's done can't be undone; and I tell you there's nothing against us unless the dead could come to life.
Page 8 - this seems so impertinent that I cannot tell how to comply with it ; and what a mortifying story will our conversation be to a young gentleman ! " " Well," says Mrs Veal,
Page 38 - ... which, I should observe, we had taken with all the rooms we had searched below. The bedroom my servant had selected for me was the best on the floor — a large one, with two windows fronting the street. The four-posted bed, which took up no inconsiderable space, was opposite to the fire, which burned clear and bright ; a door in the wall to the left, between the bed and the window, communicated with the room which my servant appropriated to himself. This last was a small room with a...
Page 15 - Dutch books which were translated, wrote upon death, and several others; but Drelincourt, she said, had the clearest notions of death and of the future state of any who had handled that subject. Then she asked Mrs. Bargrave whether she had Drelincourt. She said "Yes.
Page 46 - And now, as this impression grew on me, — now came, at last, horror, horror to a degree that no words can convey. Still I retained pride, if not courage; and in my own mind I said, "This is horror; but it is not fear; unless I fear I cannot be harmed; my reason rejects this thing; it is an illusion, — I do not fear.

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