Alice in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass

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Sterling Publishing Company, Inc., 2009 - Juvenile Fiction - 150 pages
3 Reviews

Nothing’s more magical than going down the rabbit hole and through the looking glass with Alice. There, in worlds unlike any other ever created, conventional logic is turned upside down and wrong-way round to enchanting effect. Children will love reading Carroll’s many humorous nonsense verses and meeting such unforgettable characters as the Mad Hatter, the Knave of Hearts who steals some tarts, and the grinning Cheshire Cat (in Alice in Wonderland) and Tweedledee, Tweedledum, Humpty Dumpty, and the Jabberwock (in Through the Looking Glass).

 

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Alice In Wonderland & Through the Looking Glass

User Review  - bobbiejo77 - Overstock.com

Was pleasantly surprised to receive a Nice and sturdy Hardbound book! Purchased this book for my daughter due to required reading in an English class. Strange story but very entertaining. Read full review

User Review  - Overstock.com

I love both books I cant wait to read them to my twins. I know that some of the symbolism is way over my head but that just makes the books all the more enticing to discover. Read full review

Contents

Alice in Wonderland
1
CHAPTER
14
CHAPTER
20
CHAPTER
28
CHAPTER
59
Alices Evidence
67
LookingGlass Insects
89
Jam Every Other Day
101
Humpty Dumpty
105
CHAPTER
126
CHAPTER
143
Classic Starts Library
150
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

Charles Luthwidge Dodgson was born in Daresbury, England on January 27, 1832. He became a minister of the Church of England and a lecturer in mathematics at Christ Church College, Oxford. He was the author, under his own name, of An Elementary Treatise on Determinants, Symbolic Logic, and other scholarly treatises. He is better known by his pen name of Lewis Carroll. Using this name, he wrote Alice in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass. He was also a pioneering photographer, and he took many pictures of young children, especially girls, with whom he seemed to empathize. He died on January 14, 1898.

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