Ape House

Front Cover
Doubleday Canada, Sep 7, 2010 - Fiction - 352 pages
4 Reviews
From the author of Water for Elephants comes the story of a family of bonobo apes that is violently torn from their laboratory by animal liberation activists and placed on a TV reality show. Like Gruen's phenomenal bestseller Water for Elephants, this novel explores humans' relationships with animals and shows that animals have much to teach people about what it means to be human.


 

What people are saying - Write a review

Not Water for Elephants but pretty good...

User Review  - Klynn - Borders

While Ms. Gruen will be hard-pressed to top "Water for Elephants" a must read for everyone, "Ape house" is an informative and engaging read. Join a journey with an injured scientist, disillutioned ... Read full review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

I thought the story of this book was entertaining. Kept me hooked. I enjoyed this book a lot.

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
3
Section 2
12
Section 3
63
Section 4
66
Section 5
78
Section 6
81
Section 7
86
Section 8
107
Section 18
206
Section 19
211
Section 20
220
Section 21
226
Section 22
237
Section 23
249
Section 24
256
Section 25
259

Section 9
122
Section 10
128
Section 11
142
Section 12
163
Section 13
174
Section 14
182
Section 15
185
Section 16
193
Section 17
203
Section 26
263
Section 27
266
Section 28
282
Section 29
284
Section 30
287
Section 31
294
Section 32
301
Section 33
305
Copyright

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About the author (2010)

Canadian author SARA GRUEN is the author of the award-winning #1 bestselling novel Water for Elephants, as well as the bestseller Riding Lessons and Flying Changes. Gruen was born in Vancouver and raised in London, Ontario. She studied English literature at Carleton University in Ottawa. She shares her North Carolina home with her own version of a blended family: a husband, three children, four cats, two dogs, two horses, and a goat. In order to write this novel, Gruen studied linguistics and a system of lexigrams so she could communicate directly with the bonobos living at the Great Ape Trust in Des Moines, Iowa. She now considers them to be part of her extended family and, according to the bonobos, the feeling is mutual.

Bibliographic information