The Tragedies of Euripides

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Page 152 - O! why did God, Creator wise, that peopled highest heaven With spirits masculine, create at last This novelty on earth, this fair defect Of nature, and not fill the world at once With men, as angels, without feminine; Or find some other way to generate Mankind?
Page 101 - By heaven, methinks it were an easy leap To pluck bright Honour from the pale-faced moon, Or dive into the bottom of the deep, Where fathom-line could never touch the ground, And pluck up drowned Honour by the locks; So he that doth redeem her thence might wear Without corrival all her dignities.
Page 178 - For it behooves mortals to form moderate friendships with each other, and not to the very marrow of the soul : and the affections of the mind should be dissoluble, and so that we can slacken them, or tighten.9 But that one soul should feel pangs for two, as I now grieve for her, is a heavy burden.
Page 312 - ... injustice of the gods, that she, this creature of unblemished loveliness, must perish for the sake of a worthless woman. Even Menelaus feels it, the moment he recovers from his wrath. What hath she to do, The virgin daughter, with my Helena! * * Its former reasonings now My soul foregoes. * * * For it is not just That thou shouldst groan, but my affairs go pleasantly, That those of thy house should die, and mine see the light.
Page 260 - Bacchantes in the forest, upon which rest most of our modern notions about these mysteries. The man has actually seen the daughters of Cadmus leading the whole Bacchic rout. At first he saw them all asleep. Then they waked. And then "they let loose their hair over their shoulders ; and arranged their deer-skins, as many as had had the fastenings of their knots unloosed, and they girded the dappled hides with serpents licking their jaws; and some having in their arms a kid, or the wild whelps of wolves,...
Page 187 - This Hippolytus was, by the way, a sort of pagan monk and minion of the Moon. Milton, who was a great admirer of Euripides, has a passage in " Paradise Lost " in the same spirit with the above extract : — " O, why did God, Creator wise, that peopled highest Heaven With spirits masculine, create at...
Page 141 - ... in the first place, even to mention the name of moderation carries with it superiority, but to use it is by far the best conduct for men ; but excess of fortune brings more power to men than is convenient"; and has brought greater woes upon families, when the Deity be enraged. NURSE, CHORUS. CaoR. I heard the voice, I heard the cry of the unhappy Colchian; is not she yet appeased?
Page 187 - ... temples, either in brass, or iron, or the weighty gold, buy a race of children, each for the consideration of the value paid, and thus might dwell in unmolested houses without females.
Page 382 - THE EXCELLENCY OF THE LITURGY, M. THE OFFICES OF THE HOLY SPIRIT, M. HUMILIATION OF THE SON OF GOD : TWELVE SERMONS, 9d. , APPEAL TO MEN OF WISDOM AND CANDOUR, 3d. .' , DISCOURSES ON BEHALF OF THE JEWS, It.M. " The works of Simeon, containing 253...
Page 158 - ... The Athenians happy of old, and the descendants of the blessed gods, feeding on the most exalted wisdom of a country sacred and unconquered, always tripping elegantly through the purest atmosphere, where they say that of old the golden-haired Harmonia gave birth to the chaste nine Pierian muses.

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