Lives of the Most Eminent Foreign Statesmen: Armand Jean duPlessis, cardinal de Richelieu; Axel, count Oxensteirn [sic]; Gaspar de Guzman, count Olivarez, duke of San Lucar; Julius, cardinal Mazarin

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Longman, Rees, Orme, Brown & Green, 1836 - Statesmen
 

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Page 52 - February, 1627Such an occasion was seldom suffered to pass by Richelieu without the attainment of some personal object ; for his own interests as a private individual, and his ambition as a statesman, always walked hand in hand. The danger he had incurred at Fleury, and the conspiracy of Chalais, afforded sufficient grounds for obtaining from the king a guard for his person, which he undoubtedly desired and procured, though he affected to be adverse to a proceeding which placed him, in one respect...
Page 294 - January 5th, 1649. itself, were conducted with the greatest secrecy ; so that while the turbulent Parisians fancied the court fully occupied with the festivities of Christmas, Mazarin, the prince de Conde, who was now more friendly to the regent, the king, the queen, and all the principal members of the administration, made their escape from Paris on the night preceding Twelfth-day. The army was brought near to Paris ; a lettre de cachet was sent to the parliament, commanding it to retire from the...
Page 95 - Richelieu, however, could bear no contradiction in the course which he had laid down for himself;" [How strong a resemblance does that feature of his character bear to one of an illustrious individual whom I will not further describe!] "and hurrying back to Paris with the King, he sent, in the monarch's name, a command (or the members of the Parliament to present themselves at the Louvre, in a body and on foot.
Page 90 - Richelieu's niece, however, all her passion burst forth, and she assailed her with such low and violent invective that Madame de Combalet retired from her presence in tears. Richelieu saw from the countenance of his niece, as she passed' through the room in which he waited, the reception she had met with, and soon found that his own was not to be milder. The queen forgot the dignity of her station and the softness of her sex, and, in language more fit for the markets than the court, called him rogue,...
Page 150 - ... the Rhine into the territories of the landgravine of Hesse, whom Richelieu had induced to declare in favour of France against the house of Austria. Few important advantages, however, were gained in the field by the duke's army, which, having joined that of Bannier, was still kept in complete check by Picolomini, till Longueville, falling ill, gave up the command to the count de Guebriant, and returned to France. In the meanwhile Richelieu lost no occasion of raising up enemies to the house of...
Page 21 - AD 1611. and Richelieu might have hoped to obtain that place in his regard which others had occupied before, had not the monarch on every occasion evinced towards him that personal, dislike and distrust, which had been implanted and nourished by all who felt and dreaded his superiority. A seat in the council had been stipulated for him in the negotiations of Angers, but it had always been withheld ; and at the death of the favourite the marriage of his niece was the only promise which had been accomplished....
Page 280 - It is possible that the great mind of Richelieu, his gigantic power, and the terrors of his name, might have enabled him, if he had lived, to have carried on his system longer than he did ; but no other man could do it after he was gone ; and Mazarin, convinced that such was the case, determined to modify the policy of the minister he followed, in a manner to which it is prohable the character of Chavigny would not have submitted. At his very first outset, however, he was destined to encounter that...
Page 138 - March 23. 1638. f It may be necessary to remark, that a letter, without a signature, addressed to the prince de Conde, published, I believe, in all editions of the memoires du due de Rohan, and generally attributed to him, was written many months after his death by the due de la Vallette, and refers to events in which Rohan had no share whatever. of the pettiest frailties that degrade mankind, however vast and surprising' may have been his genius in other respects.
Page 134 - ... upon Sardinia, retook the islands of Hieres, which had been captured by the Spaniards some time before. In Languedoc also, the Spaniards, who had invaded that province and attacked Leucate, were surprised during the night by the son of marshal Schomberg, and forced to fly with disgrace and loss * ; and they were also driven back from Guyenne by the due de la Valette. In the north still greater successes attended the royal armies ; Landreci was taken, * Sept. 28. 1637. and La Capelle reconquered...
Page 317 - ... withdrawn on the death of her brother, Mazarin found himself obliged to make some farther concessions than he had at first intended. The French court, in the mean time, remained during the winter in Provence ; but all things being * One of his letters to the French plenipotentiaries at Munster in 1645 shows that he had considered all the results of this marriage fifteen years before it took place ; and that Spain also considered the renunciation of the contingent rights of the infanta in the...

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