Pulpit Politics: Or, Ecclesiastical Legislation on Slavery, in Its Disturbing Influences on the American Union

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Faran & McLean, Publishers, 1862 - Slavery - 624 pages
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Page 103 - And, ye masters, do the same things unto them, forbearing threatening: knowing that your Master also is in heaven; neither is there respect of persons with him.
Page 180 - And if a man smite his servant, or his maid, with a rod, and he die under his hand; he shall be surely punished. Notwithstanding, if he continue a day or two, he shall not be punished: for he is his money.
Page 159 - And thou, son of man, be not afraid of them, neither be afraid of their words, though briers and thorns be with thee, and thou dost dwell among scorpions: be not afraid of their words, nor be dismayed at their looks, though they be a rebellious house. And thou shalt speak my words unto them, whether they will hear, or whether they will forbear: for they are most rebellious.
Page 103 - Servants, be obedient to them that are your masters, according to the flesh, with fear and trembling, in singleness of your heart, as unto Christ: not with eyeservice, as men-pleasers, but as the servants of Christ, doing the will of God from the heart ; with good will doing service, as to the Lord, and not to men : knowing that whatsoever good thing any man doth, the same shall he receive of the Lord, whether he be bond or free.
Page 458 - I would therefore call the special attention of Congress to the subject, and respectfully suggest the propriety of passing such a law as will prohibit, under severe penalties, the circulation in the Southern States, through the mail, of incendiary publications intended to instigate the slaves to insurrection.
Page 592 - Those who quit their proper character, to assume •what does not belong to them, are, for the greater part, ignorant both of the character they leave, and of the character rthey assume. Wholly unacquainted with the world in which they are so fond of meddling, and inexperienced in all its affairs, on which they pronounce with so much confidence, they have nothing of politics but the passions they excite.
Page 400 - Whereas, in the event of a separation, a contingency to which the declaration asks attention as not improbable, we esteem it the...
Page 403 - Conference acknowledge that slavery is contrary to the laws of God, man, and nature, and hurtful to society; contrary to the dictates of conscience and pure religion, and doing that which we would not others should do to us and ours?
Page 518 - The government of the United States, then, though limited in its powers, is supreme; and its laws, when made in pursuance of the Constitution, form the supreme law of the land, ' ' anything in the Constitution or laws of any State to the contrary notwithstanding.

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