A Collection and Abridgement of Celebrated Criminal Trials in Scotland: From A. D. 1536 to 1784. With Historical and Critical Remarks

Front Cover
Hugo Arnot
A. Napier, 1812 - Judgments, Criminal - 440 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 136 - ... is the most transcendent privilege which any subject can enjoy or wish for, that he cannot be affected either in his property, his liberty, or his person, but by the unanimous consent of twelve of his neighbours and equals. A constitution that I may venture to affirm, has, under Providence, secured the just liberties of this nation for a long succession of ages.
Page 136 - So that the liberties of England cannot but subsist so long as this palladium remains sacred and inviolate ; not only from all open attacks, (which none will be so hardy as to make), but also from all secret machinations which may sap and undermine it...
Page 251 - My Lords, I tamely submit to my hard sentence. I forgive the jury, and the witnesses, who have sworn several things falsely against me ; and I declare before the great God, and this auditory, that I had no previous knowledge of the murder of Colin Campbell, of Glenure, and am as innocent of it as a child unborn. I am not afraid to die ; but what grieves me, is my character, that after ages should think me capable of such a horrid and barbarous murder.
Page 251 - If you had been successful in that rebellion, you might have been giving the law where you have now received the judgment of it; we, who are this day your judges, might have been tried before one of your mock courts of judicature; and then you might have been satiated with the blood of any name or clan to which you had an aversion.
Page 221 - May last, when he was riding about a gun-shot behind his master in the wood of Lettermore, he heard a shot, which he took to be the report of a musket. It neither alarmed him nor did he know whence it came ; but, when he came up he saw the preceding witness wringing his hands, and his master lying on the ground with a great deal of blood about him, just breathing, and not able to speak. The deponent was desired by the preceding witness to go in quest of Mr. Campbell, of Ballieveolan, and his sons,...
Page 405 - She is said to have been but eleven years of age : and although it is probable that hysterical affections may in part have occasioned her rhapsodies to proceed from real illusion, as well as accounted for the contortions which agitated her body, yet she seems to have displayed an artifice above her years, an address superior to her situation, and to have been aided by accomplices, which dulness of apprehension, or violence of prejudice, forbade the bystanders to discover. "This actress was abundantly...
Page 222 - I am in haste ;" and so went over the ferry about an hour before Glenure crossed it. The deponent, who was in company with Glenure, for the purpose of executing the warrant of ejectment, crossed the ferry along with him, and went on before. When he had...
Page 342 - She went to the place of execution dressed in a black robe and petticoat, •with a large hoop, a white fan in her hand, and a white sarsnet hood on her head, according to the fashion of the times. When she came upon the scaffold, she put off the ornamental...
Page 338 - ... of Mrs. Macleod ; by comparing the deeds produced with the hand-writing of Household, taken down in their presence ; and by the evidence which Henderson led of an alibi. He added, that she had formed a malicious intention to hang her neighbour, and it was but just she should fall into her own snare. Upon the whole, his Lordship observed that, by her artful and horrid contrivance, Mrs. Macleod had well nigh made " an innocent man suffer death. That this contrivance was, by the good providence...
Page 397 - ... were successful; and that she was the cause of his failing in his circumstances, and of nothing prospering with him in the world : that she threatened mischief against one Kerse, who thereupon lost the power of his leg and arm : that she entertained several witches in her house, one of whom went out at the roof in likeness of a cat, and then resumed her own shape : that she took a disease off her husband, laid it under the barn floor, and transferred it to his nephew, who, when he came into the...

Bibliographic information