The Ecological Approach to Visual Perception

Front Cover
Psychology Press, 1986 - Psychology - 332 pages
8 Reviews
This is a book about how we see: the environment around us (its surfaces, their layout, and their colors and textures); where we are in the environment; whether or not we are moving and, if we are, where we are going; what things are good for; how to do things (to thread a needle or drive an automobile); or why things look as they do.

The basic assumption is that vision depends on the eye which is connected to the brain. The author suggests that natural vision depends on the eyes in the head on a body supported by the ground, the brain being only the central organ of a complete visual system. When no constraints are put on the visual system, people look around, walk up to something interesting and move around it so as to see it from all sides, and go from one vista to another. That is natural vision -- and what this book is about.
 

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Review: The Ecological Approach to Visual Perception

User Review  - Robert St.Amant - Goodreads

Pick up a hammer. How did you know which end to pick up? It's not necessarily experience or intelligence; toddlers do the same with their toy tools, as well as chimpanzees in laboratory experiments ... Read full review

Review: The Ecological Approach to Visual Perception

User Review  - Scott - Goodreads

A very dense argument about our notion of perception and how we see the world. I was especially interested in Gibson's explanation of "Affordance Theory" which is relevant to some of my current research. Read full review

Contents

PART ONE THE ENVIRONMENT TO BE PERCEIVED
5
Permanence and Change of the Layout
12
Substances
19
The Qualities of Substantial Surfaces
31
The Environment of One Observer and the Environment of All Observers
43
FOUR THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN STIMULATION
47
Do We Ever See Light as Such?
54
A Demonstration That the Retinal Image Is Not Necessary for Vision
61
What Is Seen at This Moment from This Position Does Not Comprise What
195
The Puzzle of Egocentric Awareness
201
TWELVE LOOKING WITH THE HEAD AND EYES
203
How Does the EyeHead System Work? Outline of a New Theory
209
The Fallacy of the Stimulus Sequence Theory
219
The Control of Locomotion and Manipulation
225
Rules for the Visual Control of Locomotion
232
FOURTEEN THE THEORY OF INFORMATION PICKUP
238

The Intercept Angle
69
Covering Edges
76
How Is Ambient Light Structured? A Theory
86
A Special Case
92
The Optical Information for Perceiving Events
102
The Causation of Events
109
The Specifying of Limb Movements
120
Summary
126
EIGHT THE THEORY OF AFFORDANCES
127
A Recent History
138
Is There Evidence Against the Direct Perception of Surface Layout?
166
The Coperception of Ones Own Movement
182
ELEVEN THE DISCOVERY OF THE OCCLUDING EDGE
189
Input Processing
251
A New Approach to Knowing
258
FIFTEEN PICTURES AND VISUAL AWARENESS
267
A Theory of Drawing and Its Development in the Child
274
What About the Illusion of Reality? The Duality of Picture Perception
280
The Consciousness of the Visual Field
285
Summary
291
A Theory of Filming and FilmEditing
297
CONCLUSION
303
BIBLIOGRAPHY
313
NAME INDEX
319
Copyright

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