London Booksellers and American Customers: Transatlantic Literary Community and the Charleston Library Society, 1748-1811

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Univ of South Carolina Press, 2002 - History - 522 pages
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James Raven's history of the Charleston Library Society's book purchasing activities offers a window into the transatlantic book trade during the 18th and 19th centuries, and a chronicle of this early library's influence on southern culture. Founded in 1748 and still flourishing at the start of the 21st century, the Charleston Library Society occupies a position of historical significance comparable to that of the Library Company of Philadelphia, the New York Library Society, and the Boston Athenaeum. It members provided the initiative for the founding of the Charleston Museum, the College of Charleston, and numerous civic and literary societies. Raven reveals how the Charleston library grew into an effective force for the pursuit of intellectual and scientific interests and the confirmation of the political power of South Carolina's planter elite.
 

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Contents

Colonial Book Traffic and Transadantic Community
3
The Enrichment of Charleston and Literature in South Carolina
19
The Early Membership and Mission of the Library Society
37
Organization and Sociability
53
New Members and the Desire for Grandeur
67
The Booksellers
84
Ordering the Books
102
Financing the Orders
115
Fiction Prints and Changing Attractions
184
Pirates Reprints and the Final Letters
204
Epilogue
218
The Letter Book
233
APPENDIX 1
267
Members of the Charleston Library Society before 1779
343
APPENDIX 3
357
Notes
375

Getting the Books Across 733
133
Literary Priorities
150
Learned and Scientific Community
166

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