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I had the privilege of meeting with and discussing the so-called "War on Drugs" with Johann (see page 267 of book). Throughout the discussion, it was abundantly obvious that Hari had captured the essence of this failed drug war and its' consequences on society---economically, psychologically, and above all socially. As America is currently experiencing an opioid abuse crisis that mirrors that of the 60's and 70's, it is time to cogently reflect upon what policies and practices, never mind laws can be enacted that will minimize the harm associated with the unfair and discriminatory application of both the law and its execution. It's time for America to wake up and realize that arrest and incarceration have done little if anything to contain the devastating effects of drug use and abuse. Hari deserves credit for confronting this crisis honestly, candidly and above all bluntly! FREDERICK T. MARTENS 

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I would read this book after reading Michelle Alexander's book The New Jim Crow, which does a much better job of summarizing the problem of mass incarceration in America and how it is fueled by the war on drugs. This author is a bit less critical than Alexander when it comes to methods. Sometimes she really digs deep and demonstrates how expert backed results are not as solid as they seem, but mostly that sort of critical examination is limited to helping her make her point. She makes it too easy for people who understand how statistics are collected to argue against her, thus putting her entire argument at risk. That is a shame because many of the ideas she puts forth in this book, which is primarily focused on legalizing drugs, are fantastic and should be seriously considered by policymakers in America and other countries with similar drug laws.
Despite some flaws, there are some things this author does really well. Hari is great at illustrating the difference between America and other countries, who have successfully changed drug laws and have, as a result, realized a much more manageable solution to addiction and crime. She also does a great job of comparing the past prohibition of alcohol to the current prohibition of marijuana, and she conducts a very thoughtful investigation into whether legalizing all drugs, including the most addictive drugs, could be beneficial. Her points are compelling. Supporting her argument for the legalization of drugs, Hari provides wonderful evidence from neuroscience, criminology, and psychology to demonstrate that legal alcohol is actually far more harmful, in every way imaginable, than many other illegal substances. She gets an A+ for this. Her solid arguments were backed up by well replicated results from studies aimed at understanding the biological, medical, neuroscientific, and psychological effects of alcohol on a person.
Bottom line, if confirmation bias and other heuristic mistakes drive you crazy when trying to read a book, you will have a little bit of a problem with this book. However, I think it is more than worth reading because the content outlines some of the most important topics in American politics today. We need to do something about our failed drug war. There is no question about that. Hari's suggestion, laid out in this book, provide a really great conversation starter because, in my opinion, the questions she asks are essential questions that must be addressed by every policy maker in America and everywhere else in the world.
 

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This book was very hooking. Could not drop it.

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