Entering America: Northeast Asia and Beringia Before the Last Glacial Maximum

Front Cover

Where did the first Americans come from and when did they get here? That basic question of American archaeology, long thought to have been solved, is re-emerging as a critical issue as the number of well-excavated sites dating to pre-Clovis times increases. It now seems possible that small populations of human foragers entered the Americas prior to the creation of the continental glacial barrier. While the archaeological and paleoecological aspects of a post-glacial entry have been well studied, there is little work available on the possibility of a pre-glacial entry.

Entering America seeks to fill that void by providing the most up-to-date information on the nature of environmental and cultural conditions in northeast Asia and Beringia (the Bering land bridge) immediately prior to the Last Glacial Maximum. Because the peopling of the New World is a question of international archaeological interest, this volume will be important to specialists and nonspecialists alike.

 

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Contents

David B Madsen I ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONS IN NORTHEAST ASIA
27
Environments of Northwestern North America
63
THE IMPLICATIONS OF AMERICAN ARCHAEOLOGY
95
PreClovis Sites and Their Implications for Human Occupation
139
The Nature of Clovis Blades and Blade Cores
159
Molecular Genetic Diversity in Siberians and Native Americans
187
HunterGatherer Population Expansion
239
TimeSpace Dynamics in the Early Upper Paleolithic
255
Humans along the PaciŠc Margin of Northeast Asia
285
The Search for a Clovis Progenitor in Subarctic Siberia
311
Monte Verde Field Archaeology
379
The Relative Probabilities of Late PreLGM or Early
389
Contributors
471
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About the author (2004)

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D. B. Madsen is a research associate at the Division of Earth and Ecosystem Science at the Desert Research Institute in Reno, Nevada and at the Texas Archaeological Research Laboratory at the University of Texas, Austin.

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