Putnam's Vegetable Book

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G. P. Putnam, 1917 - Vegetable gardening - 275 pages
 

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Page 250 - Ohio: Wooster. Oklahoma: Stillwater. Oregon: Corvallis. Pennsylvania: State College. Porto Rico: Mayaguez. Rhode Island: Kingston. South Carolina: Clemson College. South Dakota: Brookings. Tennessee: Knoxville. Texas: College Station. Utah: Logan. Vermont: Burlington. Virginia: Blacksburg. Washington: Pullman. West Virginia: Morgantown. Wisconsin: Madison. Wyoming: Laramie.
Page 250 - Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Porto Rico, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming.
Page 122 - ... near some frequently used path or building where it can receive attention without interfering with other work. The hotbed should always face to the south, and the south side of either a dwelling, barn, tight board fence, hedge, or anything affording similar protection, will furnish a good location. In the North the hotbed should be started in February or early in March, in order that such plants as the tomato and early cabbage may be well grown in time to plant in the open ground. There are two...
Page 233 - ... a family with $100 worth of vegetables during the year, while the average return for farm crops is considerably less than one-tenth of this amount. A bountiful supply of vegetables close at hand where they may be secured at a few moments' notice is of even more importance than the mere money value. Fresh vegetables from the home garden are not subjected to exposure on the markets or in transportation and are not liable to become infected in any way. Many of the products of the garden lose their...
Page 1 - ARTICHOKE, GLOBE. Deep, rich sandy loam, with a liberal supply of well-rotted manure, is best suited for growing artichokes. Plant the seeds as soon as the soil is warm in the spring, and when the plants have formed three or four leaves they may be transplanted to rows 3 feet apart and 2 feet apart in the row. The plants...
Page 53 - ... true bulb like the onion, but the stem is uniformly thick throughout. Leeks are marketed in bunches, like young onions, and they may be stored the same as celery for winter. Leeks are used for flavoring purposes and are boiled and served with a cream dressing, the same as young onions.
Page 129 - ... as a rule, not be relied upon. Throughout the Northern States it is desirable to start plants of certain crops before the danger of frost has passed. The simplest method of starting a limited number of early plants is by means of a shallow box placed in a south window of the dwelling.
Page 145 - Where plants are not to be transplanted twice, but remain in the plant bed until required for setting in the garden, it may be necessary to thin them somewhat. This part of the work should be done as soon as the plants are large enough to pull, and before they begin to " draw " or become spindling from crowding. When thinning plants in the plant bed it should be the aim to remove the centers of the thick bunches, leaving the spaces as uniform as possible. When thinning the rows of seedlings in the...
Page 83 - ... prevent their crowding. The cultivation should be the same as for parsnips or carrots, and frequent use of a wheel hoe will avoid the necessity for hand weeding. Salsify may be dug in the autumn and stored or allowed to remain in the ground during the winter, as its treatment is the same as for parsnips. Salsify is a biennial, and if the roots are not dug before the second season they will throw up stems and produce seed. It is of a weedy nature and care should be taken that it does not run wild...
Page 144 - ... is used in setting plants it should be applied after the hole has been partially filled, and the moist earth should then be covered with dry soil to prevent baking. Where water is available for irrigation it will be sufficient to puddle the roots and then irrigate after the plants are all in place. Plants should be set a trifle deeper in the garden than they were in the plant bed. The majority of plants require to be set upright, and where the dibble is used for planting, care should be taken...

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