The Politics of History: With a New Introduction

Front Cover
University of Illinois Press, 1990 - History - 390 pages
0 Reviews
Includes a series of case studies and essays arguing for a radical approach to history and providing a revisionist interpretation of the historian's role.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

THE POLITICS OF HISTORY

User Review  - Jane Doe - Kirkus

A collection of historical articles and theoretical essays by the author of SNCC: The New Abolitionists, (1964). Zinn holds that historians must write as participant-observers in contemporary social ... Read full review

Contents

Introduction to the First Edition
1
APPROACHES
5
History as private enterprise
15
What is radical history?
35
ESSAYS IN AMERICAN HISTORY
57
The Ludlow Massacre
79
LaGuardia in the Jazz Age
102
The Limits of the New Deal
118
Aggressive Liberalism
195
Vietnam The Moral Equation
209
The Prisoners A Bit of Contemporary History
223
Violence The Double Standard
237
Hiroshima and Royan
250
THEORY AND PRAXIS
275
The Historians
288
The Philosophers
320

Abolitionists and the Tactics of Agitation
137
Psychoanalyzing the Dissenter Two Cases
153
Liberalism and Racism
167
Albany Georgia and the New Frontier
179
Philosophers Historians and Causation
352
Notes
369
Index
380
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1990)

A committed radical historian and activist, Howard Zinn approaches the study of the past from the point of view of those whom he feels have been exploited by the powerful. Zinn was born in Brooklyn, New York in 1922. After working in local shipyards during his teens, he joined the U.S. Army Air Force, where he saw combat as a bombardier in World War II. He received a Ph.D. in history from Columbia University in 1958 and was a postdoctoral fellow in East Asian studies at Harvard University. While teaching at Spelman College in Atlanta, Georgia, Zinn joined the civil rights movement and wrote The Southern Mystique (1964) and SNCC: The New Abolitionists (1964). He also became an outspoken critic of the Vietnam War, writing Vietnam: The Logic of Withdrawal (1967) and visiting Hanoi to receive the first American prisoners released by the North Vietnamese. Zinn's best-known and most-praised work, as well as his most controversial, is A People's History of the United States (1980). It explores American history under the thesis that most historians have favored those in power, leaving another story untold. Zinn discusses such topics as Native American views of Columbus and the socialist and anarchist opposition to World War I in examining his theory that historical change is most often due to "mass movements of ordinary people." Zinn's other books include You Can't Be Neutral on a Moving Train: A Personal History of Our Times (1995) and Artists in Times of War (2004). He has also written the plays Emma (1976), Daughter of Venus (1985), and Marx in Soho (1999).

Bibliographic information