Response to Modernity: A History of the Reform Movement in Judaism

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Wayne State University Press, 1995 - Religion - 494 pages
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The movement for religious reform in modern Judaism represents one of the most significant phenomena in Jewish history during the last two hundred years. It introduced new theological conceptions and innovations in liturgy and religious practice that affected millions of Jews, first in central and Western Europe and later in the United States.

Today Reform Judaism is one of the three major branches of Jewish faith. Bringing to life the ideas, issues, and personalities that have helped to shape modern Jewry, Response to Modernity offers a comprehensive and balanced history of the Reform Movement, tracing its changing configuration and self-understanding from the beginnings of modernization in late 18th century Jewish thought and practice through Reform's American renewal in the 1970s.

 

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Response to modernity: a history of the Reform Movement in Judaism

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Meyer, author of works on the religious and intellectual history of contemporary Jews, here presents a lucid and thorough history of the Reform movement in Judaism. After analyzing the precedents for ... Read full review

Contents

The Question of Precedents
3
Adapting Judaism to the Modern World
10
Ideological Ferment
62
Growth and Conflict on German Soil
100
European Diffusion
143
The Reform Movements Land of Promise
225
Classical Reform Judaism
264
Reorientation
296
An International Movement
335
The New American Reform Judaism
353
In Quest of Continuity
385
Guiding Principles of Reform
391
Bibliographical Essay
475
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About the author (1995)

Michael A. Meyer is Adolph S. Ochs Professor of Jewish History at Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion in Cincinnati and the international president of the Leo Baeck Institute. He received his Ph.D. from Hebrew Union College.

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